Course Descriptions

Week 1: May 21-25, 2018

Joni Scheftel, Elizabeth Schiffman & Carrie Klumb
PubH 7230 Section 101 Class #87970
May 21 (9 am-12 pm)
May 22, 23, 25 (8 am-12 pm)
1 credit or 15 CE contact hours

Using state and national surveillance data as an anchor, this graduate-seminar style class will explore the major zoonotic and vectorborne diseases of importance in the United States. Basic public health principles will be covered in the context of the epidemiology, prevention and control of zoonotic and vectorborne diseases. Students will be given opportunities to work independently and as part of a group. Students will create plain language educational materials and participate in a debate on a public health topic with vectorborne or zoonotic relevance.

William Toscano, Jr.
PubH 7262 Section 101 Class 87395
May 21 (9 am-12 pm)
May 22, 23, 25 (8 am-12 pm)
1 credit or 15 CE contact hours

Global health concerns cross the borders of developed and developing nations. This class will focus on the effect of globalization on social and scientific consequences in public health. Topics will include the interplay between global stressors such as population, war, economics, urbanization and environment and their effects on the health of women and children, the spread of infectious and chronic diseases, nutrition and environmental health.

Joel Wu & Anne Barry
PubH 7200 Section 101 Class 87966
May 21 (9 am-12 pm)
May 22, 23, 25 (8 am-12 pm)
1 credit or 15 CE contact hours

This course will define and consider the intersection of public health and justice. Through historical review and review of current events, students will understand the importance of recognizing how the distribution of social and political determinants of health are not passive, value-neutral, naturally occurring phenomena; rather, the distribution of social and political determinants of health are both a moral issue and essential to the understanding the purpose and motivation of the public health enterprise in society.

Katherine Waters, Lillian McDonald & Buddy Ferguson
PubH 7214 Section 101 Class 87330
May 21 (9 am-12 pm)
May 22, 23, 25 (8 am-12 pm)
1 credit or 15 CE contact hours

In brief, this course explores how people perceive risk and how to communicate effectively about risk, with an emphasis on preparing you to respond when a crisis occurs and you are on the firing line. The term “risk communication” refers to a body of knowledge and a set of practical skills that can be used by government, public or private agency public health, public safety and other professionals in characterizing and managing issues, disseminating information and communicating effectively in crisis or emergency situations.  Principles of risk communication are derived from social science research, psychological research and theory, communication theory and the accumulated experience of professionals who have addressed real-world public health, public safety or emergency management communication issues on a day-to-day basis.  This course covers key concepts of risk communication theory as well as their practical application to the collection and sharing of information in support of individual and community decision-making about public health issues.  The course will also examine new media and their role in public health communication.  Challenges in communicating with underserved and non-English speaking populations will be discussed. Experiential learning in the form of interactive exercises and on-camera practice are emphasized during the course.

Carolyn Porta
PubH 7257 Section 101 Class #87482
May 21 (9 am-12 pm)
May 22, 23, 25 (8 am-12 pm)
1 credit or 15 CE contact hours

You’ve conducted a bunch of key informant interviews, or a series of focus groups. Now what? How do you reflect the participants’ individual opinions and perspectives in your analysis while at the same time draw some collective conclusions? Is it possible to analyze qualitative data objectively? Do you need to use qualitative software? What is the best way to present qualitative data to different audiences?  How can you collaboratively analyze qualitative data with community partners?

This course will provide discourse and some answers to the questions above, for currently employed professionals and students completing an advanced degree. The course is intended for students who plan to collect and analyze qualitative data, including those employed in public health, private, and non-profit agencies. Whether the data are collected to describe a problem, evaluate a program, or inform an intervention, the principles and challenges of analysis remain the same. This course will provide opportunity for analyzing and working with qualitative data from a variety of data collection methods and using multiple analysis approaches. Discussion of analyzing photograph and video data will provide students with insights on how best to analyze these types of data (time will not be spent analyzing these in class). Students are encouraged to bring any existing data they have as there may be opportunities in class to discuss and work with the data.

Carolyn Porta & Aric Bandy
PubH 7200 Section 102 Class #87973
May 21, 22, 23 (1 pm -5 pm)
May 25  (1 pm-4 pm)
1 credit or 15 CE contact hours

It’s one thing to use apps, maps, and google (e.g., sheets, docs) in our personal lives to connect with friends, track physical activity, navigate to a new coffee shop, or collaborate on a written proposal; it’s another thing to proficiently use these tools in our public health work, locally and globally. Accessible, low cost technology solutions are often underutilized in public health despite their potential for maximizing impact and efficiency. Whether a community needs assessment in North Minneapolis, an innovative micro-financing intervention in Uganda, or a multi-site program monitoring and evaluation activity along the East Coast, existing technology tools could be used to strengthen outcomes. In this course we will practically examine and apply numerous technology solutions to common public health activities and challenges. We will examine solution types (i.e., android and iphone applications, cloud-based) and purposes (i.e., data collection, management, transfer, and storage; GIS mapping, behavior tracking; team collaboration). Led by a public health nurse interventionist and a serial technology entrepreneur, students will identify solution pathways for public health challenges and activities they care about. Emphasis in this course is on learning how to use what already exists (not to create new apps per se) and how to successfully advocate for using these technology tools in current public health practice arenas locally and globally. Come prepared to learn, discuss, and engage in hands-on skills building.

Fernando Sampedro

PubH 7200 Section 103 Class #87974
May 21, 22, 23 (1 pm -5 pm)
May 25  (1 pm-4 pm)
1 credit or 15 CE contact hours

Global Food Security exists when “all people, at all times, have physical, social and economic access to sufficient safe and nutritious food that meets their dietary needs and food preferences for an active and healthy life”.  Achieving global food security involves optimizing the objectives of access, affordability, safety, nutrition and choice.  This course focuses on assuring food safety and preventing intentional contamination of the food supply (food defense) while making progress toward the broader goals of global food security.

Science provides invaluable information for evidence-based public health and food system resilience, yet good science alone is not enough to effectively address grand challenges such as global food security. Government, industry and individual decisions affecting food systems are made daily in the face of significant gaps in our scientific knowledge. Further, different government agencies typically have responsibility for different aspects of food security.  For example, the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) has the overall responsibility for assuring food access, affordability and nutrition while they share food safety responsibilities with the US Food and Drug Administration, and the Department of Homeland Security has primary responsibility for food defense. This course will stress systems thinking and a trans-disciplinary, systemic and holistic approach to food safety and defense policy, communication and action in the context of global food security.

This course will enhance participant’s understanding of food security with special attention to the role food safety and food defense knowledge and skills in the context of global food security. At the conclusion of the course, participants will be able to work more effectively on food safety, food defense and food security where industry, government, academia and civil society all are involved.

Wendy Hellerstedt
PubH 6601 Section 101 Class 88020
May 21, 22, 23 (1 pm -5 pm)
May 25  (1 pm-4 pm)
1 credit or 15 CE contact hours

The purpose of this overview course is to examine women’s health conditions, programs, services, and policies in developed and developing countries.  Global health issues will be presented in the context of a woman’s life, from childhood, through adolescence, reproductive years, and aging. The course content will emphasize social, economic, environmental, behavioral, and political factors that affect health behaviors, reproductive health, chronic and acute diseases, premature mortality and longevity. The course will have three areas of focus:  (1) how cultural definitions of women’s status affect health and well-being; (2) the measurement and interpretation of women’s health indices; and (3) programs and policies that affect women’s health (with an emphasis on global policies and funding).  Central to the course materials and discussions will be consideration of how race, ethnicity, class, culture, and gender shape women’s health outcomes.  The course will provide a mixture of lecture, media viewing, in-class critical thinking assignments, and out-of-class readings.

John Amuasi
PubH 7200 Section 103 Class #87974
May 21, 22, 23 (1 pm -5 pm)
May 25  (1 pm-4 pm)
1 credit or 15 CE contact hours

What is the definition of health from local to global contexts? How do health systems support health and well-being?  In this course, students will examine the building blocks of health systems in developing country contexts and how these blocks interact to influence public health outcomes.

Anne Barry
PubH 6711 Section 101 Class #87335
May 21, 22, 23 (1-5 pm)  May 25 (1-4 pm)
May 29, 30, 31 (1-5pm) June 1 (1-4 pm)
2 credits or 30 CE contact hours

This course will address basic concepts of public health law and the legal bases for the existence and administration of public health programs. Balancing the legal aspects of current public health issues, controversies, individual rights and the regulatory role of government in health service system will be considered.

Kirk Smith
PubH 7231 Section 101 Class #87503
May 21, 22, 23 (1 pm -5 pm)
May 25  (1 pm-4 pm)
1 credit or 15 CE contact hours

This course will focus on principles and methods for the surveillance of foodborne diseases and investigation of outbreaks, and their application for the assessment of food safety hazards. The integration of epidemiologic and laboratory methods for surveillance of human populations will be emphasized.

Stephanie Meyer & Craig Hedberg
PubH 7210 Section 101 Class #87967
May 23 (6-8 pm)
May 24 (7:00 am-5 pm)
.5 credit or 7.5 CE contact hours
S/N only

Week 2: May 29-June 1, 2018

Jerica Berge
PubH 7200 Section 104 Class #87975
May 29 (9 am -12 pm)
May 30, 31, June 1 (8 am-12 pm)
1 credit or 15 CE contact hours

Despite intense nationwide efforts to improve weight-related behaviors (e.g., healthy eating, physical activity), cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and other public health problems, progress has plateaued. Moreover, health inequities remain. The known negative health consequences resulting from these health disparities track from childhood into adulthood and create an enormous societal and economic burden. New approaches and frameworks that integrate research, clinical practice, policy, and community resources are needed to address weight-related behaviors across the lifespan. Integration is one such method that can potentially increase the success and sustainability of approaches to reduce health disparities. Integration across research, clinical practice, community, and policy domains has high potential for resulting in creating a culture of health and health equity. This course will introduce students to integration science and practice, teach about the importance of integration across research, clinical practice, community, and policy domains to address health disparities, teach skills for communicating with these entities to intentionally and successfully facilitate integration practice, and have students create their own integrated projects addressing a health disparity.

Rebecca Shlafer
PubH 7200 Section 105 Class #87976
May 29 (9 am -12 pm)
May 30, 31, June 1 (8 am-12 pm)
1 credit or 15 CE contact hours

It is now estimated that more than 2.7 million children have a parent currently behind bars, and more than 5 million children have experienced a parent’s incarceration in their lifetime. Many of the factors that increase a parent’s risk for involvement in the criminal justice system are the very same factors that increase risk for involvement in the child welfare system. When parents are incarcerated or families are involved in child protection, there are collateral consequences for children, families, communities and society. Children of incarcerated parents and those who have been victims of abuse and/or neglect are at risk for a number of adverse outcomes, including behavior problems, academic difficulties, substance abuse, and criminal activity. This course will use an interdisciplinary perspective to explore the complex intersection between parental incarceration and child welfare, focusing on the ways these systems intersect and the impacts on children and families. This class will include opportunities to learn from local and national experts from practice and policy settings. Topics will include parent-child contact during incarceration, intersections between incarceration and child welfare, and systemic disparities by race and class.

Cheryl Petersen-Kroeber
PubH 7221 Section 101 Class #87954
May 29 (9 am -12 pm)
May 30, 31, June 1 (8 am-12 pm)
1 credit or 15 CE contact hours

Public concern over the impact of disease outbreaks, environmental disasters and exposures, and the potential for intentional use of biologic, chemical, radiological, or explosive devices has led to an increased emphasis on the role of public health in disaster preparedness and response. Public health agencies, working collaboratively with colleagues in other disciplines, are front-line workers in early detection, taking action during a disaster, and supporting long-term assessment and recovery for all types of hazards. New activities of managing national or local supply stockpiles, coordinating patient care and supporting volunteer programs have expanded the traditional roles of public health in emergency preparedness. This course explores the role of public health in disaster preparedness, response and recovery and how planning and preparing public health agencies for managing the crisis, provides a foundation for effective response such as providing surge capacity to maintain public health and healthcare functions and assisting a community’s recovery from a disaster.

Mark Fiecas
PubH 7200 Section 106 Class #87977
May 29 (9 am -12 pm)
May 30, 31, June 1 (8 am-12 pm)
1 credit or 15 CE contact hours

This course will provide a broad introduction to various techniques for extracting useful information (i.e. learning) from data, a common goal shared by machine learning, data-mining, and statistical pattern recognition. Topics include: (i) Supervised learning (parametric/non-parametric algorithms, support vector machines, neural networks). (ii) Unsupervised learning (clustering, dimensionality reduction). In the second half of the course, we will introduce Bayesian methodologies for analyzing data. We will give an overview of the Bayesian modeling framework, with empirical motivations and examples, and show how to use software to proceed with data analysis.

Scott Wells & Joni Scheftel
PubH 7235 Section 101 Class #87465
May 29 (9 am -12 pm)
May 30, 31, June 1 (8 am-12 pm)
1 credit or 15 CE contact hours

Using a case-study approach and field trips, this course will explore surveillance issues related to zoonotic pathogens in animals. Students will learn how to evaluate public health surveillance systems, then will work through multiple case studies during the week and participate in a field trip to provide opportunities to apply surveillance principles learned. A final group assignment to design a surveillance system for a zoonotic pathogen will provide the opportunity to assess learning gained.

Jeff Bender
PubH 7230 Section 102 Class #87971
May 29, 30, 31 (1pm – 5 pm)
June 1  (1pm – 4pm)
1 credit or 15 CE contact hours

This overview course will review the current challenge of antibiotic resistance.  This includes a discussion of how antimicrobials are used in a variety of settings.  The second day will include an overview of antimicrobials and their actions.  This will include mechanisms for the development of resistance and how resistance disseminates in communities and the environment.  Practical applications and case studies will involve antimicrobial susceptibility testing and how results are applied in clinical settings.  Day 3 focuses on the regulatory, legal, and policies involving antibiotics.  This includes an overview of antibiotic stewardship programs instituted in human and veterinary medicine.

Julian Wolfson
PubH 7200 Section 107 Class #87978
May 29, 30, 31 (1pm – 5 pm)
June 1  (1pm – 4pm)
1 credit or 15 CE contact hours

In this course, you will learn how to manipulate data and prepare basic visualizations using the statistical software R. While the tools and techniques taught will be generic, many of the examples will be drawn from biomedicine and public health.

Jerica Berge
PubH 6060 Section 101 Class #87952
May 29, 30, 31 (1pm – 5 pm)
June 1  (1pm – 4pm)
1 credit or 15 CE contact hours

Even when individuals want to give up addictive behaviors, adopt healthier behaviors or follow a chronic disease treatment regimen, they often have a difficult time doing so.  Motivational Interviewing (MI) is a client centered directive method for enhancing intrinsic motivation to change by exploring and resolving ambivalence. This course is designed to introduce participants to the theoretical basis of the MI style and to help them begin to acquire skills and strategies for using the MI style in diverse contexts (clinic, community program, research) and relative to diverse behavioral issues (additions, healthy lifestyle behaviors, chronic disease adherence). With brief background lectures on the theoretical basis of MI and empirical evidence of its efficacy, class sessions will emphasize demonstration and practice of MI skills and strategies.

Anne Barry
PubH 6711 Section 101 Class #87335
May 21, 22, 23 (1-5 pm)  May 25 (1-4 pm)
May 29, 30, 31 (1-5pm) June 1 (1-4 pm)
2 credits or 30 CE contact hours

This course will address basic concepts of public health law and the legal bases for the existence and administration of public health programs. Balancing the legal aspects of current public health issues, controversies, individual rights and the regulatory role of government in health service system will be considered.

Cheryl Robertson
PubH 7200 Section 108 Class #87979
May 29, 30, 31 (1pm – 5 pm)
June 1  (1pm – 4pm)
1 credit or 15 CE contact hours

Students will analyze the experiences of war, displacement, and associated stressors affecting psychosocial health of refugees. The focus of the course will be on the migration experiences, family and community dynamics, and approaches for recovery. Students will develop insight and skills to create innovative community-based interventions to support refugee health.

Week 3: June 1-8, 2018

Chap T. Le
PubH 6432 Section 101 Class #87953
June 4  (9am – 12 pm)
June 5, 6, 8  (8am – 12pm)
1 credit or 15 CE contact hours

This short course on translational and clinical research will focus on the topics of diagnostic medicine and designing clinical research methods, application of regression models and early phase clinical trials.

NOTE: Students will benefit from having taken one or two semester courses in biostatistics or applied statistics covering up to and including multiple regression and introductory logistic regression.

A full version (3-credit) is offered every spring semester under the number PubH 7470.

LaRone Greer & Womazetta Jones
PubH 7200 Section 109 Class #87980
June 4  (9am – 12 pm)
June 5, 6, 8  (8am – 12pm)
1 credit or 15 CE contact hours
S/N only

This course will introduce students to child welfare as a health equity concern in public health and will provide a broad overview of health disparities in child welfare in the United States. The course will examine relevant historical trauma and trauma issues, theories, and emphasizing critical analysis and application of knowledge. Students will gain a better understanding of child welfare in public health as a health equity concern. Students will learn interventions to promote health equity through a combination of readings, lectures, reflection discussion, and in-class exercises. Students will summarize a specific health disparity in child welfare (topic and population of their choice) and develop an intervention proposal to promote health equity.

Amy Kircher & Tracey Dutcher

PubH 7200 Section 110 Class #87981
June 4 (9am – 12 pm)
June 5, 6, 8 (8am – 12pm)
1 credit or 15 CE contact hours

This course aims to equip participants with the knowledge and skills needed to be effective in complex work environments that involve critical decision-making, involvement with multiple agencies, and may be politically driven. This course has been designed to fill a gap identified by government agencies and private industry indicating there are a paucity of employees with critical thinking, decision-making, and negotiating skills. These skills are difficult to teach out of textbooks and require real- world settings to practice. This course will have didactic and significant application components where students will gain valuable experience in applying the skills and knowledge learned.

Rick Hall
PubH 7200 Section 111 Class #87982
June 4  (9am – 12 pm)
June 5, 6, 8  (8am – 12pm)
1 credit or 15 CE contact hours

In a time of extraordinary disruptions, innovative leadership is essential for the future of public health.  This course will examine current and upcoming disruptions affecting public health while exploring the application of innovation science and entrepreneurial thinking to solve problems.  In-class skill-development exercises will facilitate competence in problem solving, business modeling, customer development, marketing and finance.

Antonia Wilcoxon & LaRone Greer
PubH 7200 Section 112 Class #87983
June 4, 5, 6 (1pm – 5pm)
June 8 (1pm – 4pm)
1 credit or 15 CE contact hours

This course introduces the student to develop skills for working in and with community.  There are disparities or differential outcomes for populations of color and American Indians, both in who gets access to or involuntarily forced into services and then, once receiving services, in outcomes from the services provided. There is limited meaningful involvement of the communities being served in the design of the programs intended to support them. This results in programs being designed from the dominant culture’s perspective that make it harder to reach the outcomes all communities support and can benefit from. The first part of the class will focus on understanding community using the principles of community organizing and engagement and understanding the lived experiences of various populations. The second part of class will focus on actual practice and skill building to start the process of building relationships with community members. It is expected that participants have a basic knowledge and sensitivity to differences, power, white privilege and unconscious bias.

Steve Stovitz
PubH 7200 Section 113 Class #87984
June 4, 5, 6 (1pm – 5pm)
June 8 (1pm – 4pm)
1 credit or 15 CE contact hours
S/N only

The course is geared toward a variety of students going into the healthcare field. Whether one will be involved in direct clinical care or planning to do research that will impact clinical care, it is important to understand how to incorporate and translate evidence for the purposes of individual decision making. In medicine, this process has generally fallen under the category of “Evidence Based Medicine” (EBM). EBM was developed in the 1980s as a paradigm to move clinicians away from what had been an unscientific approach to clinical recommendations. EBM aims to judiciously incorporate the best evidence into a clinical decision that fits with a patient’s values and preferences. While this may sound simple there are under-recognized problems at several of the steps along the way from gathering to analyzing to interpreting the evidence so that a patient can make a truly informed medical decision.  The course will evaluate issues that fall between population based scientific methods and individual/personal decision making.

Kirk Smith
PubH 7230 Section 103 Class #87972
June 4, 5, 6 (1pm – 5pm)
June 8 (1pm – 4pm)
1 credit or 15 CE contact hours

Contact with animals in public settings (e.g., fairs, educational farms, petting zoos, and schools) provides opportunities for entertainment and education, and there are many positive benefits of human-animal contact. However, an inadequate understanding of disease transmission and animal behavior can increase the likelihood of infectious diseases and other health problems among visitors, especially children, in these settings. Since 1996, well over 200 human infectious disease outbreaks associated with animal contact have been identified in the United States, and the number of such outbreaks has increased markedly in recent years. Such outbreaks have substantial medical, public health, legal, and economic effects.

As in many other states, disease outbreaks associated with animal contact in public settings is an important public health problem in Minnesota; since 2000 we’ve identified over 20 such outbreaks. These types of outbreaks affect predominantly children. Outbreaks are often caused by E. coli O157:H7, which can cause a serious complication called hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) that involves kidney failure and is fatal in about 6% of cases. In 2012, a child in North Carolina died from HUS from an E. coli O157:H7 infection acquired at a highly publicized outbreak at a county fair petting zoo.

The “Compendium of Measures to Prevent Disease Associated with Animals in Public Settings” (Compendium) has been published by the National Association of Public Health Veterinarians (NASPHV) since 2005. The Compendium provides standard national recommendations for public health officials, veterinarians, animal venue operators, animal exhibitors, visitors to animal venues and exhibits, and others concerned with control of disease and with minimizing health risks associated with animal contact in public settings. Despite the presence of the national Compendium for 10 years, uptake of appropriate prevention measures at many public animal contact venues has been modest to poor, and outbreaks continue to occur as frequently as ever. Even legislation passed in some states to mandate implementation of prevention measures has failed to prevent outbreaks.

This course is designed to give students an in-depth understanding of this issue. Topics will include: a history and overview of outbreaks associated with animal contact at public venues; pathogens involved and their clinical consequences; animal types involved; contributing antecedents and risk factors; content of the Compendium recommendations; the extent of uptake of the Compendium recommendations; legislation approaches to prevention; and issues and challenges related to prevention.

Andres Perez
PubH 7200 Section 114 Class #87985
June 4, 5, 6 (1 pm – 5 pm)
June 8 (1 pm – 4 pm)
1 credit or 15 CE contact hours

This course reviews the principles and application of risk assessment and risk analysis (risk management, risk communication) applied to food safety and animal health.  The principles of risk analysis, including risk assessment, will be introduced. Qualitative and quantitative approaches for assessing risk will be reviewed and applied during the course. The goal is to promote critical thinking applied to the solution of problems, facilitating the discussion among participants and with the instructor. Participants will be encouraged to apply at least one of the analytical techniques reviewed during the course on a particular problem of their interest.

Aida Miles
PubH 7200 Section 115 Class #87986
June 4, 5, 6 (1 pm – 5 pm)
June 8 (1 pm – 4 pm)
1 credit or 15 CE contact hours

This course will take participants on an exploration of cultures, cooking and eating patterns across different cultural groups in the United States and discover how these affect their health and well-being.  Participants will explore how culture, immigration, acculturation and social determinants of health have affected individual’s food choices and health.  The focus will be on acquiring an appreciation of various cultures and an understanding of the meaning that food plays in their lives.  Participants will visit traditional food establishments to sample dishes and learn about their food traditions and eating habits.

Stephanie Meyer & Craig Hedberg
PubH 7210 Section 102 Class #87968
June 6 (6-8 pm)
June 7 (7:00 am-5 pm)
.5 credit or 7.5 CE contact hours
S/N only

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