Course Descriptions

Week 1 — May 16 – May 20, 2022

William Toscano

PUBH 7262 Section 101 Class #86238
May 16 (9 am – 12 pm)
May 17, 18, 20 (8 am – 12pm)
1 Credit or 15 CE contact hours

Global health concerns cross the borders of developed and developing nations. This class will focus on the effect of globalization on social and scientific consequences in public health. Topics will include the interplay between global stressors such as population, war, economics, urbanization and environment and their effects on the health of women and children, the spread of infectious and chronic diseases, nutrition and environmental health.

Ruby H.N. Nguyen 

PUBH 7200 Section 101 Class #87496
May 16 (9 am – 12 pm)
May 17, 18, 20 (8 am – 12pm)
1 Credit or 15 CE contact hours

Culturally-specific knowledge assists in generating effective prevention and intervention strategies. The health of Asians in America is often overlooked and understudied. In this course the epidemiology of the leading causes of disease – and their relevant exposures – among Asians in the U.S. will be introduced, with specific emphasis on Asians in Minnesota. We will discuss the need for, and barriers related to, disaggregated ethnic epidemiologic data. Community-based interventions and programs that may reduce the rates of prevalent diseases will be incorporated. Local Asian community leaders will be guest discussants in class. Specific health topics will include: Hepatitis B virus, cigarette smoking, cervical cancer, mental health, and violence against women. Assignments will include short written assignments, creation of a fact sheet on a topic chosen by the student, and a class presentation. No letter grades will be given. All students are welcome, however this course is most relevant to those in public health or related health disciplines, public policy, and social services.

Scott Wells

PUBH 7235 Section 101 Class #86285
May 16 (9 am – 12 pm)
May 17, 18, 20 (8 am – 12pm)
1 Credit or 15 CE contact hours

This course will explore surveillance issues related to zoonotic pathogens in animals, using a case-study approach focused on selected zoonotic pathogens and hazards of cattle. Students will learn concepts related to animal disease traceability, monitoring and surveillance of diseases, and methods to prevent and control zoonotic diseases from a one health perspective. The case study approach, with a field trip, will provide real-world examples for evaluating public health surveillance systems and will provide opportunities to apply surveillance principles learned. A final group assignment to address specific issues related to surveillance and control/prevention for zoonotic pathogens will provide the opportunity to assess learning gained.

Katherine Waters, Lillian McDonald, and Buddy Ferguson

PUBH 7214 Section 101 Class #87485
May 16 (9 am – 12 pm)
May 17, 18, 20 (8 am – 12pm)
1 Credit or 15 CE contact hours

In brief, this course explores how people perceive risk and how to communicate effectively about risk, with an emphasis on preparing you to respond when a crisis occurs and you are on the firing line. The term “risk communication” refers to a body of knowledge and a set of practical skills that can be used by government, public or private agency public health, public safety and other professionals in characterizing and managing issues, disseminating information and communicating effectively in crisis or emergency situations. Principles of risk communication are derived from social science research, psychological research and theory, communication theory and the accumulated experience of professionals who have addressed real-world public health, public safety or emergency management communication issues on a day-to-day basis. This course covers key concepts of risk communication theory as well as their practical application to the collection and sharing of information in support of individual and community decision-making about public health issues. The course will also examine new media and their role in public health communication. Challenges in communicating with underserved and non-English speaking populations will be discussed.

Carolyn Sheridan

PUBH 7200 Section 102 Class #87497
May 16 (9 am – 12 pm)
May 17, 18, 20 (8 am – 12pm)
1 Credit or 15 CE contact hours
S/N only

Recent outbreaks of Ebola and Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza highlight the need to have a trained work force familiar with principles to protect workers and those involved in the response. This includes preventing workers from transmitting the disease to others or to other premises. Participants will review case studies documenting potential spread of infectious agents and discuss which personal protective equipment would be indicated in a variety of field settings (focusing on field and agricultural exposure settings). This course would provide a practical opportunity to become familiar with disinfection principles including field disinfection and the use of different personal protective equipment (PPE) materials. By the end of the class students should feel comfortable with using various forms of PPE, know deficiencies, and be able to provide practical recommendations for daily situations. This course is intended for public health, health care professionals, veterinarians, and agricultural industry professionals.

Benjamin Miller

PUBH 7200 Section 103 Class #87498
May 16, 17, 18 (1 pm – 5 pm)
May 20 (1 pm – 4 pm)
1 Credit or 15 CE contact hours
S/N only

The recent legalization and decriminalization of cannabis in number of states in the United States has created varied regulatory approaches among states and the federal government. At least a dozen states have legalized “adult-use” cannabis for recreational purposes, more than 30 states have legalized cannabis for medical use, and the federal government has legalized the growth and processing of industrial hemp. While cannabis containing more than 0.3% THC by dry weight is still federally illegal, these new state and federal laws have created new markets across the United States with consumers accessing pharmaceuticals, dietary supplements, foods, vape cartridges, topicals, and other products that contain THC, CBD, and other cannabinoid containing products. Regulatory oversight of these products varies widely among states and the potential risks to public health are largely unknown or just starting to emerge. This course will examine the current state of policy and regulatory oversight of cannabis in the United States through a lens of potential public health hazards and risks. Students will learn about the current and emerging regulatory systems in states that have legalized cannabis as well as the federal government’s recent legalization of industrial hemp and will have the opportunity to conduct case studies into a specific topic of interest.

Joni Scheftel

PUBH 7230 Section 101 Class #87492
May 16, 17, 18 (1 pm – 5 pm)
May 20 (1 pm – 4 pm)
1 Credit or 15 CE contact hours

Using state and national surveillance data as an anchor, this graduate-seminar style class will explore the major zoonotic and vectorborne diseases of importance in the United States. Basic public health principles will be covered in the context of the epidemiology, prevention and control of zoonotic and vectorborne diseases. Students will be given opportunities to work independently and as part of a group. Students will create plain language educational materials and participate in a debate on a public health topic with vectorborne or zoonotic relevance.

Anne Barry

PUBH 6711 Section 101 Class #86193
May 16, 17, 18 (1 pm – 5 pm)
May 20 (1 pm – 4 pm)
May 23, 24, 25 (1 pm – 5 pm)
May 27 (1 pm – 4 pm)
2 Credits or 30 CE contact hours

This course provides the student with a basic understanding of public health law and how to apply this understanding to practical public health situations and issues.

Marta Shore

PUBH 7264 Section 101 Class #86387
May 16, 17, 18 (1 pm – 5 pm)
May 20 (1 pm – 4 pm)
1 Credit or 15 CE contact hours

In this course, you will learn how to manipulate data and prepare basic visualizations using the statistical software R. While the tools and techniques taught will be generic, many of the examples will be drawn from biomedicine and public health.

Craig Hedberg and Stephanie Meyer

PUBH 7210 Section 101 Class #87494
May 18 (6 pm – 8 pm)
May 19 (7:30 am – 5 pm)
0.5 Credit or 7.5 CE contact hours
S/N only

An understanding of the global food system impact of pollinator health is important in the protection of the public’s health. While the Upper Midwest is a high honey producing region, yields are declining due to a variety of stressors affecting bees. This intricate food system will be reviewed looking at the human, animal, and environmental impacts of bee health and honey/wax production. A commercial bee operation will be visited to illustrate care and handling of bees and discussion of bee health and environmental issues related to the safety of bee/honey products. A honey processing plant will be visited to follow the product from production through processing to create the variety of fresh and processed bee/honey products demanded by today’s consumers. The product distribution system is reviewed. Processing and distribution issues related to food safety are discussed. The global impacts of hive health on agriculture and the human food supply will be addressed.

Week 2 — May 23 – May 27, 2022

Cheryl Petersen-Kroeber

PUBH 7221 Section 101 Class #87486
May 23 (9 am – 12 pm)
May 24, 25, 27 (8 am – 12 pm)
1 Credit or 15 CE contact hours

Public concern over the impact of disease outbreaks, environmental disasters and exposures, and the potential for intentional use of biologic, chemical, radiological, or explosive devices has led to an increased emphasis on the role of public health in disaster preparedness and response. Public health agencies, working collaboratively with colleagues in other disciplines, are front-line workers in early detection, taking action during a disaster, and supporting long-term assessment and recovery for all types of hazards. New activities of managing national or local supply stockpiles, coordinating patient care and supporting volunteer programs have expanded the traditional roles of public health in emergency preparedness. This course explores the role of public health in disaster preparedness, response and recovery and how planning and preparing public health agencies for managing the crisis, provides a foundation for effective response such as providing surge capacity to maintain public health and healthcare functions and assisting a community’s recovery from a disaster.

Kate Carlson and Peter Wiringa

PUBH 7253 Section 101 Class #86276
May 23 (9 am – 12 pm)
May 24, 25, 27 (8 am – 12 pm)
1 Credit or 15 CE contact hours
S/N only

This course is an introduction to the concepts and uses of Geographic Information Systems (GIS). Lecture topics include GIS data structures, sources of data, GIS tools, vendors and software, health-related GIS applications, and resources. Through a combination of presentations and hands-on exercises, participants will learn and apply basic GIS concepts and the fundamentals of spatial analysis. Hands-on exercises include spatial data display and query, map generation, data collection, and simple spatial analysis using ArcGIS software. Students will be required to apply GIS concepts, assigned readings, and project development principles to design their own GIS project. This course is designed for participants with no experience working with GIS software or applications. Participants should have experience working with spreadsheets.

Katey Pelican

PUBH 7200 Section 104 Class #87499
May 23 (9 am – 12 pm)
May 24, 25, 27 (8 am – 12 pm)
1 Credit or 15 CE contact hours

Over the last decade, the One Health approach has gained support as a practical and valuable way to address complex issues at the interface of humans, animals, and the environment.  Moving from theory to application is more challenging though, and experts within each sector are eager for practical tools that enable an ‘operational’ approach to working across agency and disciplinary lines. The One Health Systems Mapping and Analysis Resource Toolkit (OH-SMARTTM) was co-developed by the University of Minnesota and the U.S. Department of Agriculture to meet this need.  Using real-life challenges like zoonotic disease surveillance and response, people from different sectors work through a series of specific steps adapted from business process improvement and participatory leadership methods, to create a visual representation, or map, of the system of communication and coordination between their agencies – the One Health system.  With a shared understanding of the system, the toolkit supports people from multiple sectors to jointly analyze and evaluate the system, decide how to strengthen it, and then develop an implementation plan with actionable steps to achieve improvement.

Julian Wolfson

PUBH 7200 Section 105 Class #87500
May 23, 24, 25 (1pm – 5pm)
May 27 (1pm – 4pm)
1 Credit or 15 CE contact hours

Historically, advancements in public health have mostly been supported by statistical analyses that use inference to quantify associations between risk factors and health outcomes. With recent explosions in the availability of data and computing power, however, there is increasing interest in developing models for prediction that use a large number of inputs to guess the future status of complex processes, from epidemics to an individual’s risk of developing a chronic disease.

This course introduces key concepts and techniques that are relevant to using and assessing prediction models for public health data. Students will learn how to use statistical models to predict binary and continuous outcomes and how to compare the performance of multiple models using cross-validation and sample splitting. We will also discuss how uncritical use of automated algorithms has the potential to increase health disparities. Guest speakers will give presentations on the use and pitfalls of prediction modeling in public health practice.

For the final project, students will build a prediction model for a provided dataset of public health relevance. On the final day of class, students will have the opportunity to test their model on previously unseen data and compare the performance of their model to their classmates.

Sarah Gollust

PUBH 7200 Section 106 Class #87501
May 23, 24, 25 (1pm – 5pm)
May 27 (1pm – 4pm)
1 Credit or 15 CE contact hours

Mass media has a large influence on the public’s health, not only in terms of the public’s health behaviors (such as health promotion campaigns), but also in terms of their attitudes — how the public thinks about which public health issues are important and which ones should be garnering policymakers’ attention. This course will focus on the latter: understanding the roles of the media in shaping public opinion and thus the political avenues for health policy action. We will discuss the major ways in which the media shape the public’s attitudes and beliefs, and analyze the application of these themes to the experiences in the United States during the COVID-19 pandemic since 2020. We will also discuss ways public health professionals can use the media to more effectively communicate, by better understanding what the news media value. Finally, we will review emerging evidence on the best ways to combat misinformation in a complex and dynamic information environment. Throughout the course, we will apply a health equity lens to ways of understanding media institutions, public opinion, and promising practices in messaging.

Kirk Smith

PUBH 7231 Section 101 Class #87489
May 23, 24, 25 (1pm – 5pm)
May 27 (1pm – 4pm)
1 Credit or 15 CE contact hours

This course will focus on principles and methods for the surveillance of foodborne diseases and investigation of outbreaks, and their application for the assessment of food safety hazards. The integration of epidemiologic and laboratory methods for surveillance of human populations will be emphasized.

Anne Barry

PUBH 6711 Section 101 Class #86193
May 16, 17, 18 (1 pm – 5 pm)
May 20 (1 pm – 4 pm)
May 23, 24, 25 (1 pm – 5 pm)
May 27 (1 pm – 4 pm)
2 Credits or 30 CE contact hours

This course provides the student with a basic understanding of public health law and how to apply this understanding to practical public health situations and issues.

Tanya Bailey

PUBH 7200 Section 107 Class #87502
May 23, 24, 25 (1pm – 5pm)
May 27 (1pm – 4pm)
1 Credit or 15 CE contact hours

The human-animal bond (HAB) is a type of interaction shared by many people, and these connections are often perceived as beneficial – even healing – for human well-being. Based on aspects of the human condition such as geography, economic status, and preference (or motivation), animals can be viewed as pets and companions, food sources, livelihood, or entertainment. Why do people have an attraction to animals? What are the impacts – positive and negative – when humans and animals come together? Using a public health lens to explore the reciprocity between human health and animal health, students will learn that what is valued about these experiences can be subjective, competitive, controversial, and transformational.

Craig Hedberg, Stephanie Meyer

PUBH 7210 Section 102 Class #87495
May 25 (6 pm – 8 pm)
May 26 (7:30 am – 5 pm)
0.5 Credit or 7.5 CE contact hours
S/N only

Farmers markets have become important local food distribution systems. They provide opportunities for farmers to directly market fresh produce to consumers and provide consumers access to locally produced seasonal fruits and vegetables. The USDA estimated that more than 5% of farms in the US distributed foods exclusively through direct-to-consumer channels in 2012.  Interest in local food distribution coincides with interest in organic food production systems in support of sustainable agricultural systems.  Farmers markets increasingly support supplemental nutrition programs to promote food security.  However, foods marketed directly to consumers may be exempt from regulatory food safety standards required of larger commercial enterprises. The challenges of food safety and benefits food security will be explored from the perspectives of producers, operators and consumers of farmers’ markets.

Week 3 — May 31 – June 3, 2022

Gilbert Patterson

PUBH 7200 Section 108 Class #87503
May 31 (9am – 12pm)
June 1, 2, 3 (8am – 12pm)
1 Credit or 15 CE contact hours

Transboundary animal diseases (TADs) are highly contagious epidemic diseases that have broad reaching implications for human and animal health. These diseases spread rapidly, are irrespective of national borders, and have resulted in some of the most high profile international crises in recent memory. While much of One Health focuses on zoonotic diseases and their impact, it is imperative that transboundary animal diseases are also recognized for their impact on the health and wellbeing of humans, animals, and the environment. These diseases cause high rates of death and disease in animals, and have severe socio-economic and public health implications. Some of these include depriving communities of livelihoods and nutrition, psychological trauma, animal welfare challenges, disruption of ingrained cultural norms, and environmental damage. Globalization, land encroachment and climate change contribute to outbreaks of such animal diseases, creating a constant threat to public health throughout the world. This course will provide an overview of transboundary and emerging animal and zoonotic diseases, their routes of introduction and spread, and the role of state, national, and international agencies in controlling these diseases. Some of these diseases will include those that are transmissible to humans – Such as COVID 19, brucellosis, bovine tuberculosis, parasitic illnesses, anthrax, bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) and influenza viruses. Other high impact diseases to be covered include African Swine Fever, Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea, peste des petits, and MERS. The global distribution and prevalence of these diseases will be described and analyzed from a One Health perspective. Special focus and discussion will be dedicated to examining the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, and the specific impacts of this public health crisis during the present and into the future.

Shailey Prasad

PUBH 7200 Section 113 Class #87508
May 31 (9am – 12pm)
June 1, 2, 3 (8am – 12pm)
1 Credit or 15 CE contact hours

Global Health, while a relatively new field, carries a long legacy that continues to shape the field. The COVID pandemic and the George Floyd murder have triggered conversations about the future of Global Health. Foremost among these conversations are issues around decolonization and equity. This course will look at the current state of global health and the ethical frameworks that need to be considered in global health engagements.

The course will open with a review of the history of Global Health. Various ethical frameworks including Development Ethics, Public Health Ethics etc., will be reviewed. Students will also engage in discussions on ethical issues in pandemics, disasters and global aid. . Lastly the class will engage in application of ethical frameworks using case scenarios pertinent to global health. The course will also feature guest speakers with personal experience in global health The course will feature a mixture of in-class lectures, readings, discussions, case studies, and presentations.

Genelle Lamont

PUBH 7200 Section 109 Class #87504
May 31 (9am – 12pm)
June 1, 2, 3 (8am – 12pm)
1 Credit or 15 CE contact hours

As sovereign nations, American Indian Tribes are responsible for the overall health and well-being of their members along with the land and environment of their tribe. Tribes are becoming increasingly involved in more public health activities and regulation, and deliver public health services through various funding sources, grants and contracts, alone or in collaboration with other tribes and local, county and state health departments. In this course students will learn about the legal responsibility of the United States to provide health services to American Indians. Students will examine the public health issues facing American Indian communities; review historical implications, analyze legislation, apply specific financing requirements, and gain an understanding of the unique American Indian public health system and the complex set of services, activities, collaborations and stakeholders that varies by tribe and region. Additionally, Indigenous knowledge will be shared that offers a focus on historical holistic views and programs for health and wellness that emphasizes assets, resilience, and cultural humility. This knowledge is applicable for all populations throughout the World.

Jamie Umber

PUBH 7230 Section 102 Class #87493
May 31 (9am – 12pm)
June 1, 2, 3 (8am – 12pm)
1 Credit or 15 CE contact hours

Antibiotic resistance is a global challenge. This overview course will provide a forum to discuss how antimicrobials are used in a variety of settings and how resistance develops. We will discuss the mechanisms for the development of resistance and how resistance can disseminate in different animal and human populations as well as the environment. Practical applications and case studies will be provided to highlight appropriate antibiotic usage. This includes a discussion on current antibiotic stewardship efforts instituted in human and veterinary medicine. The focus will be policies in the United States but global efforts will also be discussed. Students will provide further insight in timely topics related to antibiotic resistance issues and policies to address this emerging trend. This includes a review of the regulatory, legal, and current policies involving antibiotic use.

Shaylene Baumbach

PUBH 7200 Section 110 Class #87505
May 31, June 1, 2 (1pm – 5pm)
June 3 (1pm – 4pm)
1 Credit or 15 CE contact hours
S/N only

Local Public Health departments have been leading local COVID-19 response efforts for the past 20 months.  The global pandemic has thrust public health into the spotlight, but COVID-19 response efforts are just one of the many ways that local public health departments are ensuring strong communities by preventing illness and improving the health of all. Take a closer look at how local public health departments have been handling the response and take a deeper dive into the various programs and services provided.  This session will highlight local Minnesota counties as examples and provide guest speakers from the public health profession field.

Courtney Sarkin

PUBH 7200 Section 111 Class #87506
May 31, June 1, 2 (1pm – 5pm)
June 3 (1pm – 4pm)
1 Credit or 15 CE contact hours

Historically, and currently, the LGBTQ community has faced systematic discrimination and oppression, which can lead to poorer health outcomes and poorer access to health care. Much of this discrimination has been codified in policy and can also be addressed with policy solutions. A core theme of this course is how policy can hinder and harm vs. help health for LGBTQ individuals. Public health researchers and advocates are active in finding ways to improve LGBTQ health through policy efforts, but much more needs to be done. In this class we will start with readings and presentations from community organizations to provide foundational knowledge on sexual orientation and gender identity. Next we’ll build on this by discussing the associations between sexual orientation & gender identity and health, healthcare access, and health outcomes. Lastly, we’ll examine the multiple ways in which policy impacts health and avenues for public health professionals to improve LGBTQ health through policy action.

Jerica Berge

PUBH 6060 Section 101 Class #86351
May 31, June 1, 2 (1pm – 5pm)
June 3 (1pm – 4pm)
1 Credit or 15 CE contact hours

Even when individuals want to give up addictive behaviors, adopt healthier behaviors or follow a chronic disease treatment regimen, they often have a difficult time doing so. Motivational Interviewing (MI) is a client centered directive method for enhancing intrinsic motivation to change by exploring and resolving ambivalence. This course is designed to introduce participants to the theoretical basis of the MI style and to help them begin to acquire skills and strategies for using the MI style in diverse contexts (clinic, community program, research) and relative to diverse behavioral issues (additions, healthy lifestyle behaviors, chronic disease adherence). With brief background lectures on the theoretical basis of MI and empirical evidence of its efficacy, class sessions will emphasize demonstration and practice of MI skills and strategies.

Lauren Bernstein

PUBH 7200 Section 112 Class #87507
May 31, June 1, 2 (1pm – 5pm)
June 3 (1pm – 4pm)
1 Credit or 15 CE contact hours
S/N only

This course explores how our social identities influence our engagement with and decision-making for patients, clients, and communities. By expanding our understanding of how the social determinants of health impact both human and animal health and well-being, this course will highlight how interprofessional collaboration leads to creative, effective, and more holistic solutions to access to health/veterinary care challenges. This course will involve a combination of facilitated discussions, guest lectures, reflections, and active learning activities.

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