Course Descriptions

Week 1 — May 20-24, 2019

LaRone Greer and Anne Barry
PubH 7200 Section 117 Class #87564
May 20 (9 am-12 pm)
May 21, 22, 24 (8 am-12 pm)
1 credit or 15 CE contact hours
S/N only

This course will introduce students to child welfare as a health equity concern in public health and will provide a broad overview of health disparities in child welfare in the United States. The course will examine relevant historical trauma and trauma issues, theories, and emphasizing critical analysis and application of knowledge. Students will gain a better understanding of child welfare in public health as a health equity concern. Furthermore, students will understand and recognize the disparities in outcomes particularly for African-American and American Indian children and their families. Students will learn interventions to promote health equity through a combination of readings, lectures, reflection discussion, and in-class exercises. Students will summarize a specific health disparity in child welfare (topic and population of their choice) and develop an intervention proposal to promote health equity.

William Toscano, Jr.
PubH 7262 Section 101 Class #86731
May 20 (9 am-12 pm)
May 21, 22, 24 (8 am-12 pm)
1 credit or 15 CE contact hours

Global health concerns cross the borders of developed and developing nations. This class will focus on the effect of globalization on social and scientific consequences in public health. Topics will include the interplay between global stressors such as population, war, economics, urbanization and environment and their effects on the health of women and children, the spread of infectious and chronic diseases, nutrition and environmental health.

Cheryl Petersen-Kroeber
PubH 7227 Section 101 Class #87484
May 20 (9 am-12 pm)
May 21, 22, 24 (8 am-12 pm)
1 credit or 15 CE contact hours
S/N only

Almost any disruption to a community impacts the public’s health. This course is designed to provide public health professionals with the knowledge and skills necessary to effectively manage personnel and resources in an emergency incident. This course will provide an overview of how the standardized ICS system is applied within the context of public health. During disasters, public health has a responsibility not only to respond to specific public health threats but also to ensure that essential public health services are maintained for the affected community. The incident management system provides a formalized and common method of management practices applicable in virtually any setting.  By understanding incident management systems, public health professionals will be better prepared to lead their agency’s response in crisis situations where interaction with other local, state, tribal, and federal partners is crucial. The health professional’s ability to understand and apply incident management system techniques is a core competency for public health leaders. This course is not a substitute for required National Incident Management System training courses, it is intended to demonstrate how the use of the incident command system can be used by public health partners.

Katherine Waters, Lillian McDonald & Buddy Ferguson
PubH 7214 Section 101 Class #86667
May 20 (9 am-12 pm)
May 21, 22, 24 (8 am-12 pm)
1 credit or 15 CE contact hours

In brief, this course explores how people perceive risk and how to communicate effectively about risk, with an emphasis on preparing you to respond when a crisis occurs and you are on the firing line. The term “risk communication” refers to a body of knowledge and a set of practical skills that can be used by government, public or private agency public health, public safety and other professionals in characterizing and managing issues, disseminating information and communicating effectively in crisis or emergency situations.  Principles of risk communication are derived from social science research, psychological research and theory, communication theory and the accumulated experience of professionals who have addressed real-world public health, public safety or emergency management communication issues on a day-to-day basis. This course covers key concepts of risk communication theory as well as their practical application to the collection and sharing of information in support of individual and community decision-making about public health issues.  The course will also examine new media and their role in public health communication. Challenges in communicating with underserved and non-English speaking populations will be discussed. Experiential learning in the form of interactive exercises and on-camera practice are emphasized during the course.

Carolyn Porta
PubH 7200 Section 101 Class #87525
May 20 (9 am-12 pm)
May 21, 22, 24 (8 am-12 pm)
1 credit or 15 CE contact hours

Sexual violence in the United States and around the world has unprecedented attention and intolerance. Terms such as ‘toxic masculinity’ and ‘active consent’ are familiar to students, and professionals. All genders are revealing victimization, and demanding structural and societal changes. Can we eliminate sexual violence? Do adverse childhood experiences predict victimization or perpetration and if so, where does resilience or altered trajectories come in to play? A forensic nurse, and sexual violence prevention scientist, Dr. Porta will encourage you to critically examine contributing and mitigating factors, gaps in what we know works (or doesn’t), and multi-sectorial strategies to prevent and respond effectively. In this course, you will engage in discourse on sexual violence, in the context of other societal violence (e.g. domestic, elder abuse) and at the intersection of very real disparities and determinants of health. Gender based violence (and preventive strategies) around the world will be examined and contextualized. You will hear from survivors, and advocates, and you will explore realistic public health solutions to eliminating sexual violence.

Julian Wolfson
PubH 7200 Section 102 Class #87540
May 20, 21, 22 (1pm – 5 pm)
May 24  (1pm – 4pm)
1 credit or 15 CE contact hours

In this course, you will learn how to manipulate data and prepare basic visualizations using the statistical software R. While the tools and techniques taught will be generic, many of the examples will be drawn from biomedicine and public health.

Kirk Smith
PubH 7230 Section 101 Class #87528
May 20, 21, 22 (1 pm -5 pm)
May 24  (1 pm-4 pm)
1 credit or 15 CE contact hours

This course will provide an overview of foodborne pathogens in the United States.  Students will become familiar with the natural history and epidemiology of foodborne pathogens such as Salmonella enterica, E. coli O157:H7 and other Shiga toxin-producing E. coli, Campylobacter, Norovirus, Shigella spp., Listeria monocytogenes, Staphyloccus aureus, Clostridium perfringens, Bacillus cereus, Hepatitis A virus, Toxoplasma gondii, and others.  This will include clinical presentations, reservoirs, modes of transmission, specific food vehicles, and measures to prevent or reduce infection.

Jennifer Breen and Dr. Kate Shafto
PubH 7200 Section 103 Class #87541
May 20, 21, 22 (1 pm -5 pm)
May 24  (1 pm-4 pm)
1 credit or 15 CE contact hours

Food Matters is an applied nutrition & culinary skills course for health professional students.  The course addresses the role of food in specific health conditions and its function in health promotion and disease prevention.  The course guides future health professionals in the procurement, preparation and consumption of sustainably raised whole foods for self care and how this translates to patient care.

Kelly Searle & Kumi Smith
PubH 7200-118 Section 118 Class #87602
May 20, 21, 22 (1pm-5pm)
May 24 (1pm-4pm)
1 credit or 15 CE contact hours

This course will provide a working knowledge of two of the most widely used—yet poorly understood—methods in infectious disease (ID) research: mathematical modeling and geospatial analysis. The goals of the course are less to master these increasingly popular methods than to become informed consumers of research featuring them. Infectious diseases now regularly dominate global news headlines, particularly whether regarding outbreaks of emerging infectious diseases like zika and, Ebola, or vaccine preventable diseases like measles. Such reports often cite highly technical methods such as transmission models, geospatial analyses, or other methods less familiar to students of classical epidemiology. This course will provide a basic understanding of such methods as they relate to the traditional regression-based methods taught in most epidemiology programs. It will also explore the motivations, basic functions, and limitations of ID methods. Students who complete this course will come away with a working literacy of these methods, justifications for their use, and an awareness of their limitations.

Jerica Berge
PubH 6060 Section 101 Class #86672
May 20, 21, 22 (1 pm – 5pm)
May 24  (1 pm – 4pm)
1 credit or 15 CE contact hours

Even when individuals want to give up addictive behaviors, adopt healthier behaviors or follow a chronic disease treatment regimen, they often have a difficult time doing so.  Motivational Interviewing (MI) is a client centered directive method for enhancing intrinsic motivation to change by exploring and resolving ambivalence. This course is designed to introduce participants to the theoretical basis of the MI style and to help them begin to acquire skills and strategies for using the MI style in diverse contexts (clinic, community program, research) and relative to diverse behavioral issues (additions, healthy lifestyle behaviors, chronic disease adherence). With brief background lectures on the theoretical basis of MI and empirical evidence of its efficacy, class sessions will emphasize demonstration and practice of MI skills and strategies.

Anne Barry and Joel Wu
PubH 6711 Section 101 Class #86874
May 20, 21, 22 (1 pm – 5pm)  May 24 (1 pm – 4pm)
May 28, 29, 30 (1 pm – 5pm) May 31 (1 pm – 4pm)
2 credits or 30 CE contact hours

This course will address basic concepts of public health law and the legal bases for the existence and administration of public health programs. Balancing the legal aspects of current public health issues, controversies, individual rights and the regulatory role of government in health service system will be considered.

Stephanie Meyer & Craig Hedberg
PubH 7210 Section 101 Class #87526
May 22 (6 pm – 8pm)
May 23 (7am – 5pm)
.5 credit or 7.5 CE contact hours
S/N only

An understanding of the global food system impact of pollinator health is important in the protection of the public’s health. While the Upper Midwest is a high honey producing region, yields are declining due to a variety of stressors affecting bees. This intricate food system will be reviewed looking at the human, animal, and environmental impacts of bee health and honey/wax production.  A commercial bee operation will be visited to illustrate care and handling of bees and discussion of bee health and environmental issues related to the safety of bee/honey products. A honey processing plant will be visited to follow the product from production through processing to create the variety of fresh and processed bee/honey products demanded by today’s consumers. The product distribution system is reviewed.  Processing and distribution issues related to food safety are discussed. The global impacts of hive health on agriculture and the human food supply will be addressed.

Week 2 — May 28-31, 2019

Jeffrey Bender and Carolyn Sheridan
PubH 7200 Section 104 Class #87542
May 28 (9 am -12 pm)
May 29, 30, 31 (8 am – 12 pm)
1 credit or 15 CE contact hours
S/N only

Recent outbreaks of Ebola and Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza highlight the need to have a trained work force familiar with principles to protect workers and those involved in the response. This includes preventing workers from transmitting the disease to others or to other premises. Participants will review case studies documenting potential spread of infectious agents and discuss which personal protective equipment would be indicated in a variety of field settings (focusing on field and agricultural exposure settings). This course would provide a practical opportunity to become familiar with disinfection principles including field disinfection and the use of different personal protective equipment (PPE) materials.  By the end of the class students should feel comfortable with using various forms of PPE, know deficiencies, and be able to provide practical recommendations for daily situations. This course is intended for public health, health care professionals, veterinarians, and agricultural industry professionals.

Rebecca Shlafer
PubH 7200 Section 105 Class #87543
May 28 (9 am -12 pm)
May 29, 30, 31 (8 am-12 pm)
1 credit or 15 CE contact hours

It is now estimated that more than 2.7 million children have a parent currently behind bars, and more than 5 million children have experienced a parent’s incarceration in their lifetime. Many of the factors that increase a parent’s risk for involvement in the criminal justice system are the very same factors that increase risk for involvement in the child welfare system. When parents are incarcerated or families are involved in child protection, there are collateral consequences for children, families, communities and society. Children of incarcerated parents and those who have been victims of abuse and/or neglect are at risk for a number of adverse outcomes, including behavior problems, academic difficulties, substance abuse, and criminal activity. This course will use an interdisciplinary perspective to explore the complex intersection between parental incarceration and child welfare, focusing on the ways these systems intersect and the impacts on children and families. This class will include opportunities to learn from local and national experts from practice and policy settings. Topics will include parent-child contact during incarceration, intersections between incarceration and child welfare, and systemic disparities by race and class.

The course meets the requirement for the Health Equity Minor in the School of Public Health.

Lucy Slater
PubH 7200 Section 106 Class #87544
May 28 (9 am -12 pm)
May 29, 30, 31 (8 am-12 pm)
1 credit or 15 CE contact hours

Success of public health programs depends on the consent of the populations identified for interventions, and most programs often gain this legitimacy as services of a democratically elected government. In instances where donors bring public health programs to foreign settings, public health leaders must proactively build partnerships with indigenous government and community members to legitimize their efforts.

This course will help students develop important skills for working with indigenous partners at both the macro and micro level. Students will explore methods for building partnerships with local public health leaders and communities, and move on to considering recruitment, retention, and management of local staff in international settings.

Instruction will include direct lecture, discussion, planning and role-playing exercises for students and writing and speaking assignments that ensure students are synthesizing the information.

Scott Wells & Joni Scheftel
PubH 7235 Section 101 Class #86797
May 28 (9 am -12 pm)
May 29, 30, 31 (8 am-12 pm)
1 credit or 15 CE contact hours

Using a case-study approach and field trips, this course will explore surveillance issues related to zoonotic pathogens in animals. Students will learn how to evaluate public health surveillance systems, then will work through multiple case studies during the week and participate in a field trip to provide opportunities to apply surveillance principles learned. A final group assignment to design a surveillance system for a zoonotic pathogen will provide the opportunity to assess learning gained.

Timothy Hanson
PubH 6431 Section 101 Class #87485
May 28 (9 am -12 pm)
May 29, 30, 31 (8 am-12 pm)
1 credit or 15 CE contact hours

Hierarchical Bayesian methods combine information from various sources and are increasingly used in biomedical and public health settings to accommodate complex data and produce readily interpretable output. This course will introduce students to Bayesian methods, emphasizing the basic methodological framework, real-world applications, and practical computing.

Benjamin Miller & Carrie Rigdon
PubH 7200 Section 107 Class #87545
May 28, 29, 30 (1 pm – 5 pm)
May 31  (1 pm – 4pm)
1 credit or 15 CE contact hours

This course will explore how the intersection of science, law, economics, and human behavior has shaped the current food regulatory system.

Food safety laws and regulations in the US are complicated and have historically been largely reactive. How a food product is regulated is determined by several factors including commodity type (e.g. meat or dairy products), geography (federal, state or local jurisdiction), and location in the food supply chain (e.g. manufacturing or retail). When the first federal food laws and regulations were first promulgated in the late 1800’s and early 1900’s, it was unlikely that lawmakers would be able to predict the variety of food choices and consumer demands of today. Furthermore, technological and scientific advances are changing how food is made, and consumers are making food and dietary choices based on economic, cultural, ecological, medicinal, and political beliefs. These changes shift the risk profile of the food supply and our understanding of scientific risk needs to keep pace.

Students will get the opportunity to analyze these issues by selecting a relevant topic and presenting their analyses on the final day of the course. Examples of potential topics include: the Food Safety Modernization Act Final Rules and challenges with implementation (e.g. the Produce Safety Rule, Foreign Supplier Verification, Accreditation of Third Party Auditors to Conduct Food Safety Audits and Issue Certificates, Current Good Manufacturing Practices and Hazard Analysis and Risk-Based Preventive Controls for Human and Animal Foods), traceability, food safety vs. food freedom, the local food and cottage food movement, nutritional policy, and cross-jurisdictional issues (FDA vs. USDA). Other emerging issues include the development of cell-cultured meats and cannabis infused edible products in states and countries that have legalized recreational marijuana.

Ann Fallon
PubH 7230 Section 102 Class #87555
May 28, 29, 30 (1pm – 5 pm)
May 31  (1pm – 4pm)
1 credit or 15 CE contact hours

What’s so attractive about human blood?  How have human interactions with insects evolved? Insects and ticks transmit viral, bacterial, protozoan and filarial diseases to humans, particularly in tropical countries.  Zika, most recently, and also dengue and other mosquito-borne viruses pose an increasing challenge in the southern US as climate change increases the range of important vector species.  Lyme disease and other tick-borne diseases are increasing in the US, and pose challenges in diagnosis and treatment. This course will provide an overview of arthropod-borne disease and its impacts on global health. Students will study the historical, contemporary and epidemiologic stories demonstrating exposure and control strategies via student-led discussions, laboratory examinations, and critical review of current best practices in medical entomology.

Carrie Henning-Smith
PubH 7200 Section 108 Class #87546
May 28, 29, 30 (1pm – 5 pm)
May 31  (1pm – 4pm)
1 credit or 15 CE contact hours

Historically, and currently, the LGBTQ community has faced systematic discrimination and oppression, which can lead to poorer health outcomes and poorer access to health care. Much of this discrimination has been codified in policy and can also be addressed with policy solutions, making it important to understand the ways in which policy can hinder and harm vs. help health for LGBTQ individuals. Public health researchers and advocates are active in finding ways in which to improve LGBTQ health through policy efforts, but much more needs to be done. This class will provide an understanding of ways in which sexual orientation and gender identify are associated with health outcomes and health care access, ways in which policy impacts health, and avenues for public health professionals to improve LGBTQ health through policy action.

Andres Perez
PubH 7200 Section 109 Class #87547
May 28, 29, 30 (1 pm – 5 pm)
May 31  (1 pm – 4pm)
1 credit or 15 CE contact hours

The One Health concept, originally attributed to Dr. Calvin Schwabe, recognizes that the health of human beings, animals, and the environment is inter-connected. Under the One Health approach, researchers should be aware of correlations between species, groups, or ecosystems and be prepared to work together whenever relevant. A vast amount of scientific literature is available on the dynamics and impact of pathogens that are transmitted between human beings and animals. More than 200 zoonotic diseases have been described, including some that selectively affect marginal groups, such as bovine tuberculosis, or those that have reached pandemic proportions, with a large number of people and animals at risk worldwide, such as influenza. However, the One Health concept is much more than simply the study of the impact of zoonotic diseases. Economics certainly plays a role on One Health in relation to animal diseases that prevent development and sustain poverty and impact human health. For example, although sub-Saharan Africa’s share of global exports is minimum, it was worth ~$455 billion in 2013, which is ~10 times the amount of aid the region received the same year. Even a minimum increase in the region participation of the share of global exports, associated with appropriate policy for sharing and distribution, would have a tremendous impact on its development. One may subsequently argue that there is a need to progressively supplement or replace aid-based approaches for development models, built upon private and public partnerships. In parallel, the volume and complexity of agricultural and livestock data available to support disease prevention and control, and production has grown to levels never seen in history over the past decade. This rapid increase in the quantity of data availability has not necessarily resulted on a consequent ability to improve the quality of our information to inform policy. Consequently, an emerging grand challenge is the ability to apply quantitative epidemiology and economics tools through an interdisciplinary team of agricultural, medical, and social scientists in order to improve the quality of our policy, with the ultimate objective of improving access to food and development as a mean to improve health and wealth of local and global communities.

This course reviews the principles and application of One Health applied to public, environmental, and animal health.  The principles of One Health and their relationship with Economics, Policy, and the role of International Organizations will be introduced. A number of case studies will be discussed. The goal is to promote critical thinking applied to the solution of problems, facilitating the discussion among participants and with the instructors. Participants will be encouraged to apply knowledge gained over the course to the development of a policy brief focused on a particular problem of their interest

Anne Barry and Joel Wu
PubH 6711 Section 101 Class #86672
May 20, 21, 22 (1-5 pm)  May 24 (1-4 pm)
May 28, 29, 30 (1-5pm) May  31 (1-4 pm)
2 credits or 30 CE contact hours

This course will address basic concepts of public health law and the legal bases for the existence and administration of public health programs. Balancing the legal aspects of current public health issues, controversies, individual rights and the regulatory role of government in health service system will be considered.

Topics in Hierarchical Bayesian Analysis
Timothy Hanson
PubH 6431 Section 101 Class #87485
May 28 (9 am -12 pm)
May 29, 30, 31 (8 am-12 pm)
1 credit or 15 CE contact hours

Hierarchical Bayesian methods combine information from various sources and are increasingly used in biomedical and public health settings to accommodate complex data and produce readily interpretable output. This course will introduce students to Bayesian methods, emphasizing the basic methodological framework, real-world applications, and practical computing.

Week 3 — June 3-7, 2019

Antonia Wilcoxon & LaRone Greer
PubH 7200 Section 112 Class #87548
June 3 (9 am – 12pm)
June 4, 5, 7  (8 am – 12pm)
1 credit or 15 CE contact hours
S/N only

This course introduces the student to develop skills for working in and with community in the state of Minnesota. There are disparities or differential outcomes for populations of color and American Indians, both in who gets access to or involuntarily forced into services and then, once receiving services, in outcomes from the services provided. There is limited meaningful involvement of the communities being served in the design of the programs intended to support them. This results in programs being designed from the dominant culture’s perspective that make it harder to reach the outcomes all communities support and can benefit from.

The first part of the class will focus on understanding community using the principles of community organizing and engagement and understanding the lived experiences of various populations. experiencing disparities in Minnesota.

We will also discuss policy and policy deconstruction in practice.

The second part of class will focus on actual practice and skill building to start the process of building relationships with community members.

Practical application will include co-creating solution focuses issues mirroring actual events. It is expected that participants have a basic knowledge and sensitivity to differences, power, white privilege and unconscious bias.

Benjamin Warren & Carrie Rigdon
PubH 7200 Section 111 Class #87549
June 3 (9 am – 12pm)
June 4, 5, 7 (8 am – 12pm)
1 credit or 15 CE contact hours
S/N only

This course will practice critical thinking of current food-related issues through three lenses: food safety, food security, and food sustainability; and from three geo-political perspectives: local/Minnesota, United States, and global.

Many food-related issues today are analyzed and debated from a food safety perspective: will this food be safe to eat? Food safety is a critical aspect of public health, but it is not the only one. There are equally-important aspects of food security: do people have enough food and adequate nutrition?; and food sustainability: how does this food impact the environment in which it is made and the resources used to make it? Furthermore, these public health lenses are also influenced by the geo-political and cultural perspectives. Food safety, security, and sustainability often look different in Minnesota compared to the United States compared to globally.

Students will learn to analyze several food-related issues from these different perspectives using the polarity mapping approach. Polarity mapping is a visual tool for comparing and balancing competing, but equally valid, values. Examples of potential topics include: genetically-modified organisms (GMO) use and labeling, antibiotic use in animals raised for food, and changes in the school lunch program to promote specific nutritional profiles or local sourcing.

Innocent Rwego & Carolyn Porta
PubH 7230 Section 103 Class #87556
June 3 (9 am – 12pm)
June 4, 5, 7 (8 am – 12pm)
1 credit or 15 CE contact hours

Globally, emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases represent an increasing threat to humans, animals and biodiversity.  Despite efforts to control these infectious diseases, there are still many challenges that public health specialists face in diagnosis, prevention and management of these diseases. An increase of rural to urban migration increases contact between people; more people are encroaching on habitats for wildlife and thus increasing chance for infectious disease transmission; and the world is becoming a global village making it possible to spread a disease within a short period of time. The course will review a series of current issues in control of emerging infectious diseases; define the risk factors associated with the emergence and re-emergence of infectious diseases and serve as a forum for students to debate the controversies surrounding the control of these diseases in different cultures.

Kate Carlson
PubH 7253 Section 101 Class #86784
June 3  (9am – 12 pm)
June 4, 5, 7  (8am – 12pm)
1 credit or 15 CE contact hours
S/N only

This course is an introduction to the concepts and uses of Geographic Information Systems (GIS). Lecture topics include GIS data structures, sources of data, GIS tools, vendors and software, health-related GIS applications, and resources. Through a combination of presentations and hands-on exercises, participants will learn and apply basic GIS concepts and the fundamentals of spatial analysis. Hands-on exercises include spatial data display and query, map generation, and a simple spatial analysis using ArcGIS software. Students will be required to apply GIS concepts, assigned readings, and project development principles to create their own GIS project model.

This course is designed for participants who have not had experience working with GIS software or applications; however, participants should have some experience with spreadsheet programs.

Linda Frizzel
PubH 7200 Section 113 Class #87551
June 3 (9 am – 12pm)
June 4, 5, 7 (8 am – 12pm)
1 credit or 15 CE contact hours

As sovereign nations, American Indian Tribes are responsible for the overall health and well-being of their members along with the land and environment of their tribe. Tribes are becoming increasingly involved in more public health activities and regulation and deliver public health services through various funding sources, grants and contracts, alone or in collaboration with other tribes and local, county and state health departments.

In this course students will learn about the legal responsibility of the United States to provide health services to American Indians.  Students will examine the public health issues facing American Indian communities; review historical implications, analyze legislation, apply specific financing requirements, and gain an understanding of the unique American Indian public health system and the complex set of services, activities, collaborations and stakeholders that varies by tribe and region.

Wendy Hellerstedt
PubH 7200 Section 114 Class #87552
June 3, 4, 5 (1 pm – 5pm)
June 7 (1 pm – 4pm)
1 credit or 15 CE contact hours

Climate change is the most important public health challenge of our lifetime. There is scientific consensus that our planet is in danger because of fossil fuel emissions. Human activity has led to increasing greenhouse gases (especially carbon dioxide) and a warming planet.  A warming planet has negative consequences in terms of environmental degradation, extreme weather events, and social disruption—all of which have health and economic consequences. We can—and we must—take actions to adapt to climate-related changes and to mitigate its effects.  Such global and local actions must come from individuals, businesses, communities, and governments. Public health professionals have a large role in guiding policy, programs, and education to promote and assist such actions.

This course will present a public health perspective on climate change to assist public health professionals assess and respond to its threats.  We will examine how climate change is defined and assessed; its environmental causes and effects; and its effects on populations. We will also examine public health initiatives that include mitigation and adaptation responses; public education strategies; and policy options to reduce climate change, minimize its effects, and heighten resilience.

Kaylee Myhre Errecaborde & Amy Pekol
PubH 7200 Section 115 Class #87553
June 3, 4, 5 (1 pm – 5pm)
June 7 (1 pm – 4pm)
1 credit or 15 CE contact hours
S/N only

This course provides an overview of food governance, policy and regulation in the United States.  The roles of public and private sectors at the local, state, national and international levels will be reviewed. Different policy instruments will be discussed including legislation (laws), government regulations, the courts and legal cases, international treaties and private sector agreements. The complexity of food policy will be explored using systems thinking and stakeholder analysis.  Current issues will be analyzed to identify key stakeholders, map the policy system, and identify the core concerns. Students will learn to generate concise executive summaries and policy briefs to inform legislators and regulators.

Imee Cambronero & Elizabeth Hutchinson Kruger
PubH 7200 Section 116 Class #87554
June 3, 4, 5 (1 pm -5pm)
June 7 (1 pm – 4pm)
1 credit or 15 CE contact hours

This course has an emphasis on understanding monitoring and evaluation in international development contexts for global health, food security, nutrition, and agriculture programs. Through real-life examples of programs being implemented in Africa and Asia, students will be exposed to key monitoring, evaluation, and learning (MEL) topics through a program lifecycle including designing and planning monitoring and evaluation activities and commonly used methods, tools, and practices.  Practical and ethical challenges encountered in working in evaluation in international contexts will also be discussed.

Carolyn Porta
PubH 7257 Section 101 Class #86812
June 3, 4, 5 (1 pm – 5pm)
June 7 (1 pm – 4pm)
1 credit or 15 CE contact hours

You’ve conducted a bunch of key informant interviews, or a series of focus groups. Now what? How do you reflect the participants’ individual opinions and perspectives in your analysis while at the same time draw some collective conclusions? Is it possible to analyze qualitative data objectively? Do you need to use qualitative software? What is the best way to present qualitative data to different audiences?  How can you collaboratively analyze qualitative data with community partners?

This course will provide discourse and some answers to the questions above, for currently employed professionals and students completing an advanced degree. The course is intended for students who plan to collect and analyze qualitative data, including those employed in public health, private, and non-profit agencies. Whether the data are collected to describe a problem, evaluate a program, or inform an intervention, the principles and challenges of analysis remain the same. This course will provide opportunity for analyzing and working with qualitative data from a variety of data collection methods and using multiple analysis approaches. Discussion of analyzing photograph and video data will provide students with insights on how best to analyze these types of data (time will not be spent analyzing these in class). Students are encouraged to bring any existing data they have as there may be opportunities in class to discuss and work with the data.

Cheryl Robertson
PubH 7242 Section 101 Class #87504
June 3, 4, 5 (1 pm – 5pm)
June 7 (1 pm – 4pm)
1 credit or 15 CE contact hours

Public health problems associated with armed conflict will be examined from an interdisciplinary perspective with emphasis on analyzing the complexities. Content will include consequences of mass displacement, effects on community and family, women’s roles and experiences, trauma and healing. Health intervention strategies will be explored and critiqued. Seminar discussion format.

Stephanie Meyer & Craig Hedberg

PubH 7210 Section 102 Class #87527
June 5 (6 pm – 8pm)
June 6 (7:30 am – 5pm)
.5 credit or 7.5 CE contact hours
S/N only

Fermentation is a traditional food preservation technique. Fermented foods are increasingly popular components of modern diets due to reported beneficial effects on the gut microbiome. Production and distribution of fermented foods has emerged a cottage foods industry. An understanding of food safety practices in production of fermented foods is important for protecting public health. This course will describe fermentation processes and production practices for a variety of fermented foods from home fermentation to commercial production systems. Participants will visit facilities to see the handling and processing of raw materials and control of fermentation processes, as well as discuss potential sources of contamination, potential food safety hazards associated with incomplete fermentation, and mitigation steps that have been introduced by producers at large and small production scales. The role of cottage foods producers in the growth of fermented foods consumption will be explored. Discussion will include elements of foodborne disease epidemiology as it relates to fermented foods.

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