Course Descriptions

Week 1 — May 18-22, 2020

PubH 6432 Section 101 Class #87537
May 18 (9 am-12 pm)
May 19, 20, 22 (8 am-12 pm)
1 credit or 15 CE contact hours

This short course on translational and clinical research will focus on the topics of diagnostic medicine and designing clinical research methods, application of regression models and early phase clinical trials.

Jeff Bender, Tracey Dutcher & Heidi Vesterinen 

PubH 7200 Section 101 Class #87541
May 18 (9 am-12 pm)
May 19, 20, 22 (8 am-12 pm)
1 credit or 15 CE contact hours

Increasing public health epidemiologists are required to respond to urgent public health and animal health problems with limited time, data, and resources.  Evolving field epidemiology tools can help epidemiologists identify potential risks, characterize disease clusters or outbreaks, prepare interventions, and communicate investigation results.  This course will review field epidemiology techniques to prepare epidemiologist investigating human and animal disease outbreaks.

William Toscano, Jr.

PubH 7262 Section 101 Class #86776
May 18 (9 am-12 pm)
May 19, 20, 22 (8 am-12 pm)
1 credit or 15 CE contact hours

Global health concerns cross the borders of developed and developing nations. This class will focus on the effect of globalization on social and scientific consequences in public health. Topics will include the interplay between global stressors such as population, war, economics, urbanization and environment and their effects on the health of women and children, the spread of infectious and chronic diseases, nutrition and environmental health.

Katherine Waters, Lillian McDonald & Buddy Ferguson

PubH 7214 Section 101 Class #86712
May 18 (9 am-12 pm)
May 19, 20, 22 (8 am-12 pm)
1 credit or 15 CE contact hours

In brief, this course explores how people perceive risk and how to communicate effectively about risk, with an emphasis on preparing you to respond when a crisis occurs and you are on the firing line. The term “risk communication” refers to a body of knowledge and a set of practical skills that can be used by government, public or private agency public health, public safety and other professionals in characterizing and managing issues, disseminating information and communicating effectively in crisis or emergency situations.  Principles of risk communication are derived from social science research, psychological research and theory, communication theory and the accumulated experience of professionals who have addressed real-world public health, public safety or emergency management communication issues on a day-to-day basis. This course covers key concepts of risk communication theory as well as their practical application to the collection and sharing of information in support of individual and community decision-making about public health issues.  The course will also examine new media and their role in public health communication. Challenges in communicating with underserved and non-English speaking populations will be discussed. Experiential learning in the form of interactive exercises and on-camera practice are emphasized during the course.

Carolyn Porta

PubH 7257 Section 101 Class #86853
May 18 (9 am-12 pm)
May 19, 20, 22 (8 am-12 pm)
1 credit or 15 CE contact hours

You’ve conducted a bunch of key informant interviews, or a series of focus groups. Now what? How do you reflect the participants’ individual opinions and perspectives in your analysis while at the same time draw some collective conclusions? Is it possible to analyze qualitative data objectively? Do you need to use qualitative software? What is the best way to present qualitative data to different audiences?  How can you collaboratively analyze qualitative data with community partners?

This course will provide discourse and some answers to the questions above, for currently employed professionals and students completing an advanced degree. The course is intended for students who plan to collect and analyze qualitative data, including those employed in public health, private, and non-profit agencies. Whether the data are collected to describe a problem, evaluate a program, or inform an intervention, the principles and challenges of analysis remain the same. This course will provide opportunity for analyzing and working with qualitative data from a variety of data collection methods and using multiple analysis approaches. Discussion of analyzing photograph and video data will provide students with insights on how best to analyze these types of data (time will not be spent analyzing these in class). Students are encouraged to bring any existing data they have as there may be opportunities in class to discuss and work with the data.

Ruby Nguyen

PubH 7200 Section 102 Class #87542
May 18 (9 am-12 pm)
May 19, 20, 22 (8 am-12 pm)
1 credit or 15 CE contact hours

In this course, the epidemiology of the leading causes of disease – and their relevant exposures – among Asians in the U.S. will be introduced, with specific emphasis on Asians in Minnesota.  We will discuss the need for, and barriers related to, disaggregated ethnic epidemiologic data. Community-based interventions and programs that may reduce the rates of prevalent diseases will be incorporated. Local Asian community leaders will be guest discussants in class. Specific health topics will include: Hepatitis B virus, cigarette smoking, cervical cancer, mental health, and violence against women. Assignments will include short written assignments, creation of a fact sheet on a topic chosen by the student, and a class presentation. No letter grades will be given. All students are welcome, however this course is most relevant to those in public health or related health disciplines, public policy, and social services.

Joni Scheftel, Malia Ireland, Carrie Klumb, Jenna Bjork and Elizabeth Schiffman

PubH 7230 Section 101 Class #87562
May 18, 19, 20 (1pm – 5 pm)
May 22  (1pm – 4pm)
1 credit or 15 CE contact hours

Using state and national surveillance data as an anchor, this graduate-seminar style class will explore the major zoonotic and vectorborne diseases of importance in the United States. Basic public health principles will be covered in the context of the epidemiology, prevention and control of zoonotic and vectorborne diseases. Students will be given opportunities to work independently and as part of a group. Students will create plain language educational materials and participate in a debate on a public health topic with vectorborne or zoonotic relevance.

Lauren Gilchrist

PubH 7200 Section 103 Class #87543
May 18, 19, 20 (1pm – 5 pm)
May 22  (1pm – 4pm)
1 credit or 15 CE contact hours

The purpose of this course is to provide students with an overview of current public health policy issues that impact children and families. The course will focus on how public policy and advocacy can be used to improve the public health of children and families, with a focus on state-level policies.  Students develop practical skills to understand, analyze, communicate, and advocate for public health policies.

Julian Wolfson

PubH 7200 Section 104 Class #87544
May 18, 19, 20 (1pm – 5 pm)
May 22  (1pm – 4pm)
1 credit or 15 CE contact hours

In this course, you will learn how to manipulate data and prepare basic visualizations using the statistical software R. While the tools and techniques taught will be generic, many of the examples will be drawn from biomedicine and public health.

Benjamin Miller

PubH 7200 Section 105 Class #87545
May 18, 19, 20 (1pm – 5 pm)
May 22  (1pm – 4pm)
1 credit or 15 CE contact hours
S/N only

The recent legalization and decriminalization of cannabis in number of states in the United States has created varied regulatory approaches among states and the federal government.  At least a dozen states have legalized “adult-use” cannabis for recreational purposes, more than 30 states have legalized cannabis for medical use, and the federal government has legalized the growth and processing of industrial hemp.  While cannabis containing more than 0.3% THC by dry weight is still federally illegal, these new state and federal laws have created new markets across the United States with consumers accessing pharmaceuticals, dietary supplements, foods, vape cartridges, topicals, and other products that contain THC, CBD, and other cannabinoid containing products.  Regulatory oversight of these products varies widely among states and the potential risks to public health are largely unknown or just starting to emerge. This course will examine the current state of policy and regulatory oversight of cannabis in the United States through a lens of potential public health hazards and risks. Students will learn about the current and emerging regulatory systems in states that have legalized cannabis as well as the federal government’s recent legalization of industrial hemp and will have the opportunity to conduct case studies into a specific topic of interest.

Jerica Berge

PubH 6060 Section 101 Class #86908
May 18, 19, 20 (1 pm – 5pm)
May 22  (1 pm – 4pm)
1 credit or 15 CE contact hours

Even when individuals want to give up addictive behaviors, adopt healthier behaviors or follow a chronic disease treatment regimen, they often have a difficult time doing so.  Motivational Interviewing (MI) is a client centered directive method for enhancing intrinsic motivation to change by exploring and resolving ambivalence. This course is designed to introduce participants to the theoretical basis of the MI style and to help them begin to acquire skills and strategies for using the MI style in diverse contexts (clinic, community program, research) and relative to diverse behavioral issues (additions, healthy lifestyle behaviors, chronic disease adherence). With brief background lectures on the theoretical basis of MI and empirical evidence of its efficacy, class sessions will emphasize demonstration and practice of MI skills and strategies.

Anne Barry & Joel Wu

PubH 6711 Section 101 Class #86717
May 18, 19, 20 (1 pm – 5pm)  May 22 (1 pm – 4pm)
May 26, 27, 28 (1 pm – 5pm) May 29 (1 pm – 4pm)
2 credits or 30 CE contact hours

This course will address basic concepts of public health law and the legal bases for the existence and administration of public health programs. Balancing the legal aspects of current public health issues, controversies, individual rights and the regulatory role of government in health service system will be considered.

Stephanie Meyer & Craig Hedberg

PubH 7210 Section 101 Class #87560
May 20 (6 pm – 8pm)
May 21 (7am – 5pm)
0.5 credit or 7.5 CE contact hours
S/N only

Week 2 — May 26-29, 2020

Kimberly Anderson

PubH 7200 Section 106 Class #87546
May 26 (9 am -12 pm)
May 27, 28, 29 (8 am – 12 pm)
1 credit or 15 CE contact hours
S/N only

Direct-reading instruments (DRIs) are those that provide near real-time output of contaminant concentration or intensity. However, DRIs are fairly expensive (>$4500) and this high price point has limited their use in epidemiological or exposure studies. However, over the past ten years advances in technology have resulted in an explosion of low-cost direct-reading sensors (<$2500) designed for measuring exposures. Low-cost sensors offer the opportunity to evaluate exposure variability at high spatial and temporal resolutions however, users must understand the performance and limitations of these sensors in order to apply them appropriately. This course will explore what low-cost sensors are available, discuss the evaluation and criteria for performance, and discuss data analytics for large sensor networks. Participants will have an opportunity to use low-cost aerosol sensors to evaluate exposures and get hands-on experience analyzing the data from these instruments.

Carrie Henning-Smith & Courtney Sarkin

PubH 7200 Section 107 Class #87547
May 26 (9 am -12 pm)
May 27, 28, 29 (8 am-12 pm)
1 credit or 15 CE contact hours

Historically, and currently, the LGBTQ community has faced systematic discrimination and oppression, which can lead to poorer health outcomes and poorer access to health care. Much of this discrimination has been codified in policy and can also be addressed with policy solutions, making it important to understand the ways in which policy can hinder and harm vs. help health for LGBTQ individuals. Public health researchers and advocates are active in finding ways in which to improve LGBTQ health through policy efforts, but much more needs to be done. This class will provide an understanding of ways in which sexual orientation and gender identify are associated with health outcomes and health care access, ways in which policy impacts health, and avenues for public health professionals to improve LGBTQ health through policy action.

Scott Wells & Joni Scheftel

PubH 7235 Section 101 Class #86840
May 26 (9 am -12 pm)
May 27, 28, 29 (8 am-12 pm)
1 credit or 15 CE contact hours

This course will explore surveillance issues related to zoonotic pathogens in animals, using a case-study approach focused on selected zoonotic pathogens and hazards of cattle. Students will learn concepts related to animal disease traceability, monitoring and surveillance of diseases, and methods to prevent and control zoonotic diseases from a one health perspective. The case study approach, with a field trip, will provide real-world examples for evaluating public health surveillance systems and will provide opportunities to apply surveillance principles learned. A final group assignment to address specific issues related to surveillance and control/prevention for zoonotic pathogens will provide the opportunity to assess learning gained.

Kumi Smith & Sam Robertson

PubH 7200 Section 108 Class #87548
May 26 (9 am -12 pm)
May 27, 28, 29 (8 am-12 pm)
1 credit or 15 CE contact hours

The drug overdose crisis is one of the most pressing public health issues in the US today. The staggering rate of deaths attributed to opioid overdose has received wide attention from the media and general public. Yet the origins of our current opioid crisis are rooted in America’s long and complicated relationship with chemical substances. This course explores the social, medical, and cultural aspects of the modern American substance use phenomenon. A social and structural determinants framework will be used to examine the public health impact of substance use disorder on individuals and communities.

The course will open with a review of the history and epidemiology of the substance use epidemic in the US. Students will then learn the fundamentals of physiological and psychological aspects of chemical dependency, including addiction treatment options. The class will then examine the public health data used to describe population level substance use, including common misinterpretations of the data. The course will feature guest speakers and panelists from clinical medicine and social work, including individuals with lived experiences of substance use disorder in order to broaden insights from both clinical and experiential perspectives. It will also feature a mixture of lectures, readings, an in-class lab on the use of epidemiologic data, as well as a final project to impart a more contextual, nuanced, and in-depth understanding of substance use in modern America.

Joseph Gaugler & Tetyana Shippee

PubH 7200 Section 109 Class #87549
May 26, 27, 28 (1 pm – 5 pm)
May 29  (1 pm – 4pm)
1 credit or 15 CE contact hours
S/N only

The objective of this course is to obtain a broad understanding of the multidisciplinary perspectives, theoretical underpinnings, and advancements in the study of aging (i.e., “gerontology”). Students will review the theoretical foundations and state-of-the-art in science and practice of the following inter-related domains: clinical geriatrics; psychology of aging; sociology of aging; and policy of aging.

Wendy L. Hellerstedt

PubH 7200 Section 110 Class #87550
May 26, 27, 28 (1 pm – 5 pm)
May 29  (1 pm – 4pm)
1 credit or 15 CE contact hours

Climate change is the most important public health challenge of our lifetime. There is scientific consensus that our planet is in danger because of fossil fuel emissions. Human activity has led to increasing greenhouse gases (especially carbon dioxide) and a warming planet.  A warming planet has negative consequences in terms of environmental degradation, extreme weather events, and social disruption—all of which have health and economic consequences. We can—and we must—take actions to adapt to climate-related changes and to mitigate its effects. Such global and local actions must come from individuals, businesses, communities, and governments. Public health professionals have a large role in guiding policy, programs, and education to promote and assist such actions.

This course will present a public health perspective on climate change to assist public health professionals assess and respond to its threats.  We will examine how climate change is defined and assessed; its environmental causes and effects; and its effects on populations. We will also examine public health initiatives that include mitigation and adaptation responses; public education strategies; and policy options to reduce climate change, minimize its effects, and heighten resilience.   Many of our group activities and assignments will focus on how climate change information is conveyed—and potentially understood—by lay audiences.

PubH 7200 Section 111 Class #87551
May 26, 27, 28 (1pm – 5 pm)
May 29  (1pm – 4pm)
1 credit or 15 CE contact hours
S/N only

This course will provide an understanding of environmental justice, policy and practice in the US and some of the global policy impacts. The students will learn the concepts of environmental justice including environmental racism, social determinants, health, safety, race, and culture, communities, and systems and policies, assessing environmental risks. Students will have the opportunity to examine complex issues using equity, social justice and community participatory lenses. The course will also examine existing and emerging issues of environmental justice including different sources of chemical exposures from skin-lightening products and other sources, in home exposure of mercury and lead, the association between reproductive and early childhood health with chemical exposures, air pollution, beauty products environmental impacts, regulations, systems and policy changes.

Anne Barry & Joel Wu

PubH 6711 Section 101 Class #86717
May 18, 19, 20 (1 pm – 5pm)  May 22 (1 pm – 4pm)
May 26, 27, 28 (1 pm – 5pm) May 29 (1 pm – 4pm)
2 credits or 30 CE contact hours

This course will address basic concepts of public health law and the legal bases for the existence and administration of public health programs. Balancing the legal aspects of current public health issues, controversies, individual rights and the regulatory role of government in health service system will be considered.

Kirk Smith

PubH 7231 Section 101 Class #87564
May 26, 27, 28 (1pm – 5 pm)
May 29  (1pm – 4pm)
1 credit or 15 CE contact hours

This course will focus on principles and methods for the surveillance of foodborne diseases and investigation of outbreaks, and their application for the assessment of food safety hazards. The integration of epidemiologic and laboratory methods for surveillance of human populations will be emphasized.

Irina Stepanov

PubH 7200 Section 112 Class #87552
May 26, 27, 28 (1 pm – 5 pm)
May 29  (1 pm – 4pm)
1 credit or 15 CE contact hours
S/N only

Electronic cigarettes, or e-cigarettes, are devices designed to convert nicotine-containing liquid into aerosol that can be inhaled by users. Except for nicotine, e-cigarette aerosol generally contains fewer chemicals, and at lower concentrations, than cigarette smoke. Given its lower toxicity profile, as well as the observed reductions in many toxic exposures and improvement is certain physiological measures, e-cigarette use may offer a less harmful alternative to combustible cigarettes to adult addicted smokers who are unwilling to quit nicotine. However, there is an enormous diversity of e-cigarette devices and liquids, including custom-made devices as well as liquids that are made by unlicensed manufacturers and contain ingredients of unknown origin. This is of particular concern because use of electronic cigarettes has increased rapidly over the past decade, particularly among youth. Recent reports of acute lung injury and deaths exemplify the type of public health crisis that is almost inevitable in the absence of e-cigarette regulation. Furthermore, health consequences of long-term e-cigarette use are not well-understood. This course will give an overview of e-cigarette chemistry, toxicology, data on use patterns and behaviors, consumer perceptions, and policy and regulatory considerations. The course includes a field trip to a laboratory that conducts chemistry and biomarker research on tobacco products, including e-cigarettes.

Week 3 — June 1-5, 2020

Matt Simcik

PubH 7200 Section 113 Class #87553
June 1 (9 am – 12pm)
June 2, 3, 5  (8 am – 12pm)
1 credit or 15 CE contact hours
S/N only

Amenah A. Agunwamba

PubH 7200 Section 114 Class #87554
June 1 (9 am – 12pm)
June 2, 3, 5 (8 am – 12pm)
1 credit or 15 CE contact hours

New communication channels and media have significantly changed the information environment, providing innovative ways for patients and communities to consume, exchange, and interact with information from sources all over the world. With these developments, come challenges and opportunities for public health professionals to serve as leading sources of health information.

The primary objective of this course will be to provide students with an overview on fundamental topics in health communication, with a focus on integrating theory, research methods, and key strategies to develop effective health communication interventions. This course will cover health communication functions, mechanisms, and methods to impact behavior change throughout populations, while defining the roles of patient-physician communication, mass media communication, health education and health literacy, policy and advocacy, and finally, technology and eMedicine. This course will be very interactive through critical examination of health messages in the media and through discussion of current events relevant to health communication. Students will apply research methods and communication strategies in Opinion Editorials, the development of a PSA script, and the development of a proposal for a theory informed health communication intervention.  Ultimately, this course will equip leaders in public health to critically evaluate and address important community health issues – engaging, empowering, and influencing people through communication.

Cheryl Petersen-Kroeber

PubH 7221 Section 101 Class #87565
June 1 (9 am – 12pm)
June 2, 3, 5 (8 am – 12pm)
1 credit or 15 CE contact hours

Public concern over the impact of disease outbreaks, environmental disasters and exposures, and the potential for intentional use of biologic, chemical, radiological, or explosive devices has led to an increased emphasis on the role of public health in disaster preparedness and response. Public health agencies, working collaboratively with colleagues in other disciplines, are front-line workers in early detection, taking action during a disaster, and supporting long-term assessment and recovery for all types of hazards. New activities of managing national or local supply stockpiles, coordinating patient care and supporting volunteer programs have expanded the traditional roles of public health in emergency preparedness. This course explores the role of public health in disaster preparedness, response and recovery and how planning and preparing public health agencies for managing the crisis, provides a foundation for effective response such as providing surge capacity to maintain public health and healthcare functions and assisting a community’s recovery from a disaster.

Jeff Bender, Megan Schossow & Amy Pekol

PubH 7200 Section 115 Class #87555
June 1  (9 am – 12pm)
June 2, 3, 5  (8 am – 12pm)
1 credit or 15 CE contact hours

Health care access and health promotion in rural health areas is an important and emerging issue in the U.S.  This is exemplified with recent hospital closures, the extent and severity of the opioid crisis, and limited health care access to rural residents.  One particular population deeply affected by these issues is our agricultural community including farmers, farm workers, and their families. Acutely, this is demonstrated by the reported increased suicides and calls to mental health crisis centers.

This course will summarize efforts to reach rural communities and address mental health issues summarizing recent efforts.  This includes identifying resources, synergizing coordinated efforts, and creating outreach to vulnerable populations in rural areas.  Students will help identify populations at risk, create potential solutions, and consider how to obtain funding to support these efforts.

This course is intended for public health, policy administrators, health care professionals, veterinarians, and agricultural industry professionals.

Carolyn Porta

PubH 7200 Section 116 Class #87556
June 1  (9am – 12 pm)
June 2, 3, 5  (8am – 12pm)
1 credit or 15 CE contact hours

Sexual violence in the United States and around the world has unprecedented attention and intolerance. Terms such as ‘toxic masculinity’ and ‘active consent’ are familiar to students, and professionals. All genders are revealing victimization, and demanding structural and societal changes. Can we eliminate sexual violence? Do adverse childhood experiences predict victimization or perpetration and if so, where does resilience or altered trajectories come in to play? A forensic nurse, and sexual violence prevention scientist, Dr. Porta will encourage you to critically examine contributing and mitigating factors, gaps in what we know works (or doesn’t), and multi-sectoral strategies to prevent and respond effectively. In this course, you will engage in discourse on sexual violence, in the context of other societal violence (e.g. domestic, elder abuse) and at the intersection of very real disparities and determinants of health. Gender based violence (and preventive strategies) around the world will be examined and contextualized. You will hear from a variety of relevant stakeholders (e.g., survivors, advocates, practitioners, law enforcement, prosecutors) and you will explore (and generate) realistic public health solutions to eliminating sexual violence.

Amanda Beaudoin

PubH 7230 Section 102 Class #87563
June 1, 2, 3 (1 pm – 5pm)
June 5 (1 pm – 4pm)
1 credit or 15 CE contact hours
S/N only

Antibiotic resistance is a global challenge. This overview course will provide a forum to discuss how antimicrobials are used in a variety of settings and how resistance develops.  We will discuss the mechanisms for the development of resistance and how resistance can disseminate in different animal and human populations as well as the environment. Practical applications and case studies will be provided to highlight appropriate antibiotic usage.  This includes a discussion on current antibiotic stewardship efforts instituted in human and veterinary medicine. The focus will be policies in the United States but global efforts will also be discussed. Students will provide further insight in timely topics related to antibiotic resistance issues and policies to address this emerging trend.  This includes a review of the regulatory, legal, and current policies involving antibiotic use.

Wendy Hellerstedt

PubH 6601  Section 101 Class #87538
June 1, 2, 3 (1 pm – 5pm)
June 5 (1 pm – 4pm)
1 credit or 15 CE contact hours

“A woman’s health is her total well-being, not determined solely by biological factors and reproduction, but also by effects of work load, nutrition, stress, war and migration, among others”  —  van der Kwaak, 1991

The purpose of this overview course is to examine women’s health conditions, programs, services, and policies in developed and developing countries.  Global health issues will be presented in the context of a woman’s life, from childhood, through adolescence, reproductive years, and aging. The course content will emphasize social, economic, environmental, behavioral, and political factors that affect health behaviors, reproductive health, chronic and acute diseases, premature mortality and longevity. The course will have three areas of focus:  (1) how cultural definitions of women’s status affect health and well-being; (2) the measurement and interpretation of women’s health indices; and (3) programs and policies that affect women’s health (with an emphasis on global policies and funding). Central to the course materials and discussions will be consideration of how race, ethnicity, class, culture, and gender shape women’s health outcomes. The course will provide a mixture of lecture, media viewing, in-class critical thinking assignments, and out-of-class readings.

NCR group

PubH 7200 Section 117 Class #87557
June 1, 2, 3 (1 pm – 5pm)
June 5 (1 pm – 4pm)
1 credit or 15 CE contact hours
S/N only

In this course you will learn effective community engagement strategies for five cultures, African American, Latino, American Indian, Southeast Asian, and East African. These five Cultural Community Specialist will encourage you to critically examine how race and false narratives create divisions in the United States. This includes considerations regarding immigrants/refugee status, gender dynamics, religion and norms, historical experiences and trust in government. Other course topics include culturally specific media, communication styles, sacred spaces, major holidays/events and festivals This course will teach you to understand the role you play as working professionals in communities of color. The objective of this course is to provide a trauma informed approach for effective engagement in cultural communities and an understanding of the impact of systemic racism and colonialism has had on communities of color.  This course also will share stories of resilience and brilliance.

Kate Carlson & Peter Wiringa

PubH 7253 Section 101 Class #86829
June 1, 2, 3 (1 pm -5pm)
June 5 (1 pm – 4pm)
1 credit or 15 CE contact hours
S/N only

This course is an introduction to the concepts and uses of Geographic Information Systems (GIS). Lecture topics include GIS data structures, sources of data, GIS tools, vendors and software, health-related GIS applications, and resources. Through a combination of presentations and hands-on exercises, participants will learn and apply basic GIS concepts and the fundamentals of spatial analysis. Hands-on exercises include spatial data display and query, map generation, field data collection, and simple spatial analysis using ArcGIS software. Students will be required to apply GIS concepts, assigned readings, and project development principles to create their own GIS project model.

This course is designed for participants who have not had experience working with GIS software or applications; however, participants should have some experience with spreadsheets.

Heidi Vesterinen

PubH 7200 Section 118 Class #87558
June 1, 2, 3 (1 pm -5pm)
June 5 (1 pm – 4pm)
1 credit or 15 CE contact hours
S/N only

This course reviews the principles and application of One Health in the context of health, research, economics and international trade.

A number of case studies will be discussed. The goal is to promote critical thinking applied to the solution of problems, facilitating the discussion among participants and with the instructors and to provide the students with practical skills to advance One Health related issues in various settings. Participants will be encouraged to apply knowledge gained over the course in various ways, including an oral presentation, application of facilitation tools in mini workshops and writing a policy brief draft.

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