Course Descriptions

Week 1: May 13 – May 17, 2024

Morning

Jeff Bender, Craig Hedberg, Melanie Firestone

PUBH 7200 Section 101 Class #87107
May 13 (9 a.m. – 12 p.m.)
May 14, 15, 17 (8 a.m. -12 p.m.)
1 Credit or 15 CE contact hours
S/N only
This course will be offered in a synchronous online classroom format

The Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) was signed into law on January 4, 2011. FSMA represented the largest overhaul of the US food safety system since the passage of the Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act of 1938. Provisions of FSMA were intended to increase the mandate on food producers to prevent transmission of foodborne illness and to improve the surveillance capacity of the food safety system to detect and respond to foodborne illness. This course will review the major provisions of FSMA relating to establishing hazard analysis and risk-based preventive controls for foods. It will also review efforts to improve foodborne disease surveillance that address our ability to determine whether FSMA has resulted in a safer food supply.

Mickey Scullard, Deborah Radi, Cheryl Petersen-Kroeber

PUBH 7200 Section 102 Class #87108
May 13 (9 a.m. – 12 p.m.)
May 14, 15, 17 (8 a.m. -12 p.m.)
1 Credit or 15 CE contact hours
S/N only
This course will be offered in a synchronous online classroom format

In this course, students will explore a critical component of public health emergency response; crisis leadership. By engaging in exercises, case studies, and group discussions, students will learn the differences between everyday leadership and crisis leadership, how to engage stakeholders, manage response activities, and consider leadership’s role with employees, political leaders, and the media. Crucial skills discussed will include crisis decision-making with limited information under considerable time pressures, internal and external communication priorities, accountability, and understanding and managing policy and operational concerns. Trauma-informed leadership will also be covered as it contributes to effective responses, resiliency in leaders as well as teams, and can serve as a vital tool in a crisis leader’s toolbox. Throughout the class, students will reflect on their own strengths, learn about characteristics of crisis leaders, and identify approaches to build emotional resiliency to manage stress and anxiety.

Melinda Wilkins

PUBH 7200 Section 103 Class #87109
May 13 (9 a.m. – 12 p.m.)
May 14, 15, 17 (8 a.m. -12 p.m.)
1 Credit or 15 CE contact hours
This course will be offered in a synchronous online classroom format

This course will provide the student with a basic understanding of systems, systems thinking, and how to use a systems thinking mindset and tools to support problem solving in a One Health context. Students will learn how to engage stakeholders, recognize systems, clearly define complex problems, and visualize/diagram systems. In addition, students will practice identifying leverage points within a system and anticipate intended and unintended consequences to changes within a system. Tools and examples will be used to explain each step and students will have a chance to practice using several common systems thinking tools before student teams apply these tools to address a more complex One Health problem.

Ruby H.N. Nguyen

PUBH 7200 Section 104 Class #87110
May 13 (9 a.m. – 12 p.m.)
May 14, 15, 17 (8 a.m. -12 p.m.)
1 Credit or 15 CE contact hours
This course will be offered in a synchronous online classroom format

Culturally-specific knowledge assists in generating effective prevention and intervention strategies. The health of Asians in America is often overlooked and understudied. In this course the epidemiology of the leading causes of disease – and their relevant exposures– among Asians in the U.S. will be introduced, with specific emphasis on Asians in Minnesota. We will discuss the need for, and barriers related to, disaggregated ethnic epidemiologic data. Community-based interventions and programs that may reduce the rates of prevalent diseases will be incorporated. Local Asian community leaders will be guest discussants in class. Specific health topics will include: Hepatitis B virus, cigarette smoking, cervical cancer, mental health, and violence against women. Assignments will include short written assignments, creation of a fact sheet on a topic chosen by the student, and a class presentation. No letter grades will be given. All students are welcome, however this course is most relevant to those in public health or related health disciplines, public policy, and social services.

Afternoon

Lauren Gilchrist

PUBH 7200 Section 105 Class #87111
May 13-15 (1 p.m. – 5 p.m.)
May 17 (1 p.m. – 4 p.m.)
1 Credit or 15 CE contact hours
This course will be offered in a synchronous online classroom format

The purpose of this course is to provide students with an overview of current public health policy issues that impact children and families. The course will focus on how public policy and advocacy can be used to improve the public health of children and families, with a focus on state-level policies. Students develop practical skills to understand, analyze, communicate, and advocate for public health policies.

Kirk Smith

PUBH 7200 Section 108 Class #87114
May 13-15 (1 p.m. – 5 p.m.)
May 17 (1 p.m. – 4 p.m.)
1 Credit or 15 CE contact hours

This course will provide an overview of foodborne pathogens in the United States. Students will become familiar with the natural history and epidemiology of important foodborne pathogens such as Salmonella enterica, E. coli O157:H7 and other Shiga toxin-producing E. coli, Campylobacter, Norovirus, Shigella spp., Listeria monocytogenes, Cyclospora cayetanensis, Staphylococcus aureus, Clostridium perfringens, Bacillus cereus, Hepatitis A virus, Toxoplasma gondii, Clostridium botulinum, and others. This will include clinical presentations, reservoirs, modes of transmission, specific food vehicles, factors that contribute to contamination, proliferation, and survival on food, and measures to prevent or reduce infection.

Carolyn Porta, Megan McCaughey

PUBH 7200 Section 106 Class #87112
May 13-15 (1 p.m. – 5 p.m.)
May 17 (1 p.m. – 4 p.m.)
1 Credit or 15 CE contact hours

This course will examine the historic, current, and future value of fungi in personal and public health, and in advancing the collective health of humans, animals, and the environment. Students will learn about historical and present day uses of fungi as medicine, specific promising use of psilocybin to mitigate mental health problems and effects of trauma, the role of fungi in “one health”, and related public health practice and policy implications. A tour of the fungi grow lab on the St. Paul campus is part of the class experience.

Zach Vavra

PUBH 7253 Section 101 Class #85730
May 13-15 (1 p.m. – 5 p.m.)
May 17 (1 p.m. – 4 p.m.)
1 Credit or 15 CE contact hours
S/N only

This course is an introduction to the concepts and uses of Geographic Information Systems (GIS). Lecture topics include GIS data structures, sources of data, GIS tools, vendors and software, health-related GIS applications, and resources. Through a combination of presentations and hands-on exercises, participants will learn and apply basic GIS concepts and the fundamentals of spatial analysis. Hands-on exercises include spatial data display and query, map generation, data collection, and simple spatial analysis using ArcGIS software. Students will be required to apply GIS concepts, assigned readings, and project development principles to design their own GIS project. This course is designed for participants with no experience working with GIS software or applications. Participants should have experience working with spreadsheets.

This course has been canceled for 2024.

Anne M. Barry, Joel Wu

PUBH 6711 Section 101 Class #85649
May 13-15 (1 p.m. – 5 p.m.)
May 17 (1 p.m. – 4 p.m.)
May 20-22 (1 p.m. – 5 p.m.)
May 24 (1 p.m. – 4 p.m.)
2 Credits or 30 CE contact hours

This course provides the student with a basic understanding of public health law and how to apply this understanding to practical public health situations and issues.

Craig Hedberg, Stephanie Meyer, Melanie Firestone

PUBH 7210 Section 101 Class #87090
May 15 (6 p.m. – 8 p.m.)
May 16 (8 a.m. – 5 p.m.)
0.5 Credit or 7.5 CE contact hours
S/N only

Concerns about environmental impacts of large-scale agricultural production, food safety and food security have driven consumer interest in local food production systems.  Along with local, commercial food production, interest has grown in foraging for wild and indigenous foods.  Popular foods for foraging include greens, fruits, nuts, and mushrooms. This course will review when and where foraging for wild foods can be conducted, explore the seasonal availability and uses of various plant materials, and discuss potential food safety issues that foragers may encounter.  Participants will visit several different public land settings to learn how to identify plants and plant materials that can be foraged.

Carolyn M. Porta

PUBH 7200 Section 107 Class #87113
May 16 (8 a.m. – 5 p.m.)
0.5 Credit or 7.5 CE contact hours
S/N only

In PUBH 7200: Mycelial Leadership, students will establish a foundational understanding of the neurobiology and physiology of trauma. Students will apply this foundational knowledge to practice effective communication strategies and interventions as leaders in team environments. This course focuses on experiential learning activities to apply the principles of a trauma-informed approach to fostering healthy and healing team ecosystems through effective communication and to caring for one’s self in a sustainable, trauma-informed way.

Week 2: May 20 – May 24, 2024

Morning

Melanie Firestone

PUBH 6185 Section 101 Class #87188
May 20 (9 a.m. – 12 p.m.)
May 21, 22, 24 (8 a.m. – 12 p.m.)
1 Credit or 15 CE contact hours

This course focuses on the principles and practice of epidemiology to investigate urgent public health problems. The focus is on application of critical tools to identify, prevent, and respond to disease outbreaks, including roles and responsibilities. Modeled after the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Field Epidemiology Training Programs, the focus will include disease surveillance, descriptive epidemiology, outbreak investigations, and applied analytic methods. The course focuses on the use of sound judgment and discusses considerations for when epidemiologic theory and practical considerations conflict.

Marta Shore

PUBH 7264 Section 101 Class #85786
May 20 (9 a.m. – 12 p.m.)
May 21, 22, 24 (8 a.m. – 12 p.m.)
1 Credit or 15 CE contact hours

In this course, you will learn how to manipulate data and prepare basic visualizations using the statistical software R. While the tools and techniques taught will be generic, there will be options to use public health data.

Jeff Bender, Lillian McDonald, Allison Thrash, Doug Schultz

PUBH 7214 Section 101 Class #85794
May 20 (9 a.m. – 12 p.m.)
May 21, 22, 24 (8 a.m. – 12 p.m.)
1 Credit or 15 CE contact hours

In brief, this course explores how people perceive risk and how to communicate effectively about risk, with an emphasis on preparing you to respond when a crisis occurs and you are on the firing line. The term “risk communication” refers to a body of knowledge and a set of practical skills that can be used by government, public or private agency public health, public safety and other professionals in characterizing and managing issues, disseminating information and communicating effectively in crisis or emergency situations. Principles of risk communication are derived from social science research, psychological research and theory, communication theory and the accumulated experience of professionals who have addressed real-world public health, public safety or emergency management communication issues on a day-to-day basis. This course covers key concepts of risk communication theory as well as their practical application to the collection and sharing of information in support of individual and community decision-making about public health issues. The course will also examine new media and their role in public health communication. Challenges in communicating with underserved and non-English speaking populations will be discussed.

Asha Hassan, J’Mag Karbeah

PUBH 7200 Section 109 Class #87115
May 20 (9 a.m. – 12 p.m.)
May 21, 22, 24 (8 a.m. – 12 p.m.)
1 Credit or 15 CE contact hours
S/N only

Reproductive Justice (RJ) is the human right to maintain bodily autonomy, have children, not have children, and parent the children we have in safe and sustainable communities. This course will draw on the RJ framework to engage students in a public health analysis of historical and contemporary reproductive health issues. Topics will include American gynecological history, the eugenics movement, prenatal care and birthing, contraception, abortion access, adoption, child welfare and state intervention.

Afternoon

Amira Adawe

PUBH 7200 Section 110 Class #87116
May 20-22 (1 p.m. – 5 p.m.)
May 24 (1 p.m. – 4 p.m.)
1 Credit or 15 CE contact hours
S/N only

This course will provide understanding of environmental justice, policy and practice in the US and some of the global policy impacts. The students will learn the concepts of environmental justice including environmental racism, social determinants, health, safety, race, and culture, communities, and systems and policies, assessing environmental risks. Students will have opportunity to examine complex issues using equity, social justice and community participatory lenses. The course will also examine existing and emerging issues of environmental justice including different sources of chemical exposures from skin-lightening products and other sources, in home exposure of mercury and lead, the association between reproductive and early childhood health with chemical exposures, air pollution, beauty products environmental impacts, regulation, systems and policy changes.

Benjamin Miller

PUBH 7200 Section 111 Class #87117
May 20-22 (1 p.m. – 5 p.m.)
May 24 (1 p.m. – 4 p.m.)
1 Credit or 15 CE contact hours
S/N only

The recent legalization and decriminalization of cannabis in a number of states in the United States has created varied regulatory approaches among states and the federal government. At least a dozen states have legalized “adult-use” cannabis for recreational purposes, more than 30 states have legalized cannabis for medical use, and the federal government has legalized the growth and processing of industrial hemp. While cannabis containing more than 0.3% THC by dry weight is still federally illegal, these new state and federal laws have created new markets across the United States with consumers accessing pharmaceuticals, dietary supplements, foods, vape cartridges, topicals, and other products that contain THC, CBD, and other cannabinoid containing products. Regulatory oversight of these products varies widely among states and the potential risks to public health are largely unknown or just starting to emerge. This course will examine the current state of policy and regulatory oversight of cannabis in the United States through a lens of potential public health hazards and risks. Students will learn about the current and emerging regulatory systems in states that have legalized cannabis as well as the federal government’s recent legalization of industrial hemp and will have the opportunity to conduct case studies into a specific topic of interest.

Tai Mendenhall

PUBH 6060 Section 101 Class #87089
May 20-22 (1 p.m. – 5 p.m.)
May 24 (1 p.m. – 4 p.m.)
1 Credit or 15 CE contact hours

Even when individuals want to give up addictive behaviors, adopt healthier behaviors or follow a chronic disease treatment regimen, they often have a difficult time doing so. Motivational Interviewing (MI) is a client centered directive method for enhancing intrinsic motivation to change by exploring and resolving ambivalence. This course is designed to introduce participants to the theoretical basis of the MI style and to help them begin to acquire skills and strategies for using the MI style in diverse contexts (clinic, community program, research) and relative to diverse behavioral issues (additions, healthy lifestyle behaviors, chronic disease adherence). With brief background lectures on the theoretical basis of MI and empirical evidence of its efficacy, class sessions will emphasize demonstration and practice of MI skills and strategies.

This course has been canceled for 2024.

Anne M. Barry, Joel Wu

PUBH 6711 Section 101 Class #85649
May 13-15 (1 p.m. – 5 p.m.)
May 17 (1 p.m. – 4 p.m.)
May 20-22 (1 p.m. – 5 p.m.)
May 24 (1 p.m. – 4 p.m.)
2 Credits or 30 CE contact hours

This course provides the student with a basic understanding of public health law and how to apply this understanding to practical public health situations and issues.

Shekinah Fashaw-Walters

PUBH 7200 Section 112 Class #87118
May 20-22 (1 p.m. – 5 p.m.)
May 24 (1 p.m. – 4 p.m.)
1 Credit or 15 CE contact hours

The healthcare disparities that are pervasive across our health system today can be exacerbated, attenuated, or unchanged by the healthcare policies and practices that we implement as public health leaders. Achieving health equity requires the dismantling of institutional norms that structure inequities and the uplifting of policies and practices that allow for all people to reach their full potential. In order to do this, a clear understanding of racism’s role in policymaking is necessary. This course is designed to introduce participants to the historical issues, theories, and empirical data related to racism and its impacts on health inequities through the existence of inequitable policies and practices. With brief background lectures on racism and empirical evidence of the impacts of colorblind/race-neutral policies, class sessions will challenge students to consider how we can design more race-conscious policies and practices that will advance health equity for all.

Craig Hedberg, Stephanie Meyer, Melanie Firestone

PUBH 7210 Section 102 Class #87104
May 22 (6 p.m. – 8 p.m.)
May 23 (8 a.m. – 5 p.m.)
0.5 Credit or 7.5 CE contact hours
S/N only

Prerequisite: Must be 21 years of age by the start of the course.

Interest in local, high quality food production has also stimulated the growth of local craft brewing and distilling industries, cider and wine production. The legalization of CBD and THC-containing products has further diversified the availability of adult beverages in the marketplace. This course will review the regulatory basis for the local production and distribution of a range of adult beverages. Issues related to product safety and use will be reviewed. Participants will visit several production facilities to discuss how ingredients are sourced, products are made and distributed, and food safety concerns addressed.

Week 3 : May 28 – 31, 2024

Morning

Joseph E. Gaugler

PUBH 7200 Section 113 Class #87119
May 28 (9 a.m. – 12 p.m.)
May 29, 30, 31 (8 a.m. – 12 p.m.)
1 Credit or 15 CE contact hours
S/N only
This course will be offered in a synchronous online classroom format

Key topics addressed include: the current and projected scope of Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias (ADRD) and its ramifications for care and care systems; how changes in the brain result in cognitive impairment and ADRD; public health “tools” to address ADRD; dementia capable healthcare systems and dementia friendly communities; health equity and dementia; and public health and dementia caregiving.

Noelle Harden

PUBH 7200 Section 114 Class #87120
May 28 (9 a.m. – 12 p.m.)
May 29, 30, 31 (8 a.m. – 12 p.m.)
1 Credit or 15 CE contact hours
S/N only
This course will be offered in a synchronous online classroom format

In this highly interactive course, students and practitioners will explore the essential role of community participation in public health. Students will experience the potential of going beyond assessment surveys to deeply listen and follow the lead of community members to co-produce lasting change. Students will learn how to implement public health strategies that center the redistribution of power and resources through community-based decision making. Students will also practice using facilitation methods that bridge academic and lived knowledge, and walk away with practical tools to cultivate radical participation in their professional and personal lives.

Cheryl Petersen-Kroeber

PUBH 7221 Section 101 Class #87105
May 28 (9 a.m. – 12 p.m.)
May 29, 30, 31 (8 a.m. – 12 p.m.)
1 Credit or 15 CE contact hours
This course will be offered in a synchronous online classroom format

Public concern over the impact of disease outbreaks, environmental disasters and exposures, and the potential for intentional use of biologic, chemical, radiological, or explosive devices has led to an increased emphasis on the role of public health in disaster preparedness and response. Public health agencies, working collaboratively with colleagues in other disciplines, are front-line workers in early detection, taking action during a disaster, and supporting long-term assessment and recovery for all types of hazards. New activities of managing national or local supply stockpiles, coordinating patient care and supporting volunteer programs have expanded the traditional roles of public health in emergency preparedness. This course explores the role of public health in disaster preparedness, response and recovery and how planning and preparing public health agencies for managing the crisis, provides a foundation for effective response such as providing surge capacity to maintain public health and healthcare functions and assisting a community’s recovery from a disaster.

Afternoon

Genelle LaMont

PUBH 7200 Section 115 Class #87121
May 28-30 (1 p.m. – 5 .pm.)
May 31 (1 p.m. – 4 p.m.)
1 Credit or 15 CE contact hours
This course will be offered in a synchronous online classroom format

As sovereign nations, American Indian Tribes are responsible for the overall health and well-being of their members along with the land and environment of their tribe. Tribes are becoming increasingly involved in more public health activities and regulation, and deliver public health services through various funding sources, grants and contracts, alone or in collaboration with other tribes and local, county and state health departments. In this course students will learn about the legal responsibility of the United States to provide health services to American Indians. Students will examine the public health issues facing American Indian communities; review historical implications, analyze legislation, apply specific financing requirements, and gain an understanding of the unique American Indian public health system and the complex set of services, activities, collaborations and stakeholders that varies by tribe and region. Additionally, Indigenous knowledge will be shared that offers a focus on historical holistic views and programs for health and wellness that emphasizes assets, resilience, and cultural humility. This knowledge is applicable for all populations throughout the World.

Nancy Carlson

PUBH 7223 Section 101 Class #85823
May 28-30 (1 p.m. – 5 .pm.)
May 31 (1 p.m. – 4 p.m.)
1 Credit or 15 CE contact hours
S/N only
This course will be offered in a synchronous online classroom format

Disaster events leave a short term and perhaps a long term footprint that has not been recognized by many disciplines involved in response and recovery. In this course we will focus on developing a rich understanding of the psychological impact of disaster events of all types impact the individual, teams, organizations and communities. First we will work to develop an understanding of how disaster impact an then use a “Push Pull” service intervention model in how to work with all levels of a disaster. We will use not only presentation and discussion but also case studies and scenario based training. The course will be divided into four sections that look disaster dynamics from a behavioral health perspective, initial response strategies and issues, short term recovery interventions and long term challenges.

Megan Schossow

PUBH 7200 Section 116 Class #87122
May 28-30 (1 p.m. – 5 .pm.)
May 31 (1 p.m. – 4 p.m.)
1 Credit or 15 CE contact hours
S/N only
This course will be offered in a synchronous online classroom format

Health care access and health promotion in rural health areas is an important and emerging issue in the U.S. This is exemplified with recent hospital closures, the extent and severity of the opioid crisis, and limited health care access to rural residents. One particular population deeply affected by these issues is our agricultural community including farmers, farm workers, and their families. Acutely, this is demonstrated by the reported increased suicides and calls to mental health crisis centers. This course will summarize efforts to reach rural communities and address mental health issues summarizing recent efforts. This includes identifying resources, synergizing coordinated efforts, and creating outreach to vulnerable populations in rural areas. Students will help identify populations at risk, create potential solutions, and consider how to obtain funding to support these efforts. This course is intended for public health, policy administrators, health care professionals, veterinarians, and agricultural industry professionals interested in mental health issues affecting rural communities.

Scott Wells, Jason Lombard

PUBH 7235 Section 101 Class #87106
May 28-30 (1 p.m. – 5 .pm.)
May 31 (1 p.m. – 4 p.m.)
1 Credit or 15 CE contact hours
This course will be offered in a synchronous online classroom format

This course will explore surveillance issues related to zoonotic pathogens in animals, using a case-study approach focused on selected zoonotic pathogens and hazards of cattle. Students will learn concepts related to animal disease traceability, monitoring and surveillance of diseases, and methods to prevent and control zoonotic diseases from a one health perspective. The case study approach, with a field trip, will provide real-world examples for evaluating public health surveillance systems and will provide opportunities to apply surveillance principles learned. A final group assignment to address specific issues related to surveillance and control/prevention for zoonotic pathogens will provide the opportunity to assess learning gained.

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