Public Health Institute

The Summer Public Health Institute offers courses for students and practice professionals in public health and related fields. Participants can build or expand their professional expertise, learn best practices, broaden career options, network with other professionals, or explore a new area of interest. Courses are intensive, highly interactive and application-based with opportunities for field trips, case studies, hands-on labs, and simulations. All courses are eligible for CPH recertification credit. Credit hours vary by course.

Summer Public Health Institute 2017
May 22-June 9

Week 1: May 22-26
Week 2: May 29-June 2
Week 3: June 5-9

Who Should Attend

  • Graduate students in public health, medicine, veterinary medicine, nursing, dentistry, public affairs, law, social work, pharmacy, public policy, global health, agricultural, food and environmental sciences
  • Practice professionals in public health and other health and human service organizations; city, county, state and federal government agencies; private-sector businesses and industry

Week One: May 22-26

Antibiotic Resistance, Use and Stewardship: Theory to Practice


Antibiotic Resistance, Use and Stewardship: Theory to Practice
Jeffrey Bender

PubH 7230 Section 101 Class #88036
May 22 (9 am -12 pm)
May 23, 24, 26 (8 am-12 pm)
1 credit or 15 CE contact hours
Syllabus

This overview course will review the current challenge of antibiotic resistance. This includes a discussion of how antimicrobials are used in a variety of settings. The second day will include and overview of antimicrobials and their actions. This will include mechanisms for the development of resistance and how resistance disseminates in communities and the environment. Practical applications and case studies will involve antimicrobial susceptibility testing and how results are applied in clinical settings. Day three we focus on the regulatory legal and policies involving antibiotics. This includes an overview of antibiotic stewardship programs instituted in human and veterinary medicine.

Globalization and Health


Globalization and Health
William Toscano, Jr.

PubH 7262 Section 101 Class #87486
May 22 (9 am -12 pm)
May 23, 24, 26 (8 am-12 pm)
1 credit or 15 CE contact hours
Syllabus

Global health concerns cross the borders of developed and developing nations. This class will focus on the effect of globalization on social and scientific consequences in public health. Topics will include the interplay between global stressors such as population, war, economics, urbanization and environment and their effects on the health of women and children, the spread of infectious and chronic diseases, nutrition and environmental health.

Incident Management Systems: The Public Health Role


Incident Management Systems: The Public Health Role
Cheryl Petersen-Kroeber

PubH 7227 Section 101 Class #88115
May 22 (9 am -12 pm)
May 23, 24, 26 (8 am-12 pm)
1 credit or 15 CE contact hours
Syllabus

This course is designed to provide public health professionals with the knowledge and skills necessary to effectively manage personnel and resources in an emergency incident. The incident management system provides a formalized and common method of management practices applicable in virtually any setting. By understanding incident management systems, public health professionals will be better prepared to lead their agency’s response in crisis situations where interaction with other local, state, tribal, and federal partners is crucial. The health professional’s ability to understand and apply incident management system techniques is a core competency for public health leaders. This course is not intended to substitute for required National Incident Management System training courses.

Introduction to R


Introduction to R
Eric Weber

PubH 7200 Section 101 Class #88051
May 22 (9am – 5 pm)
May 23 (8am – 5pm)
1 credit or 15 CE contact hours
S/N only
Syllabus

This course is an introduction to statistical programming in R. The course focuses on the following skills: reading in data for analysis, cleaning data in preparation for analysis, conducting data summaries and visualizing data. The course will consist of short lectures and a number of interactive exercises. No prior knowledge of R is required. Any student looking to learn about exploratory data analysis and visualization would benefit from the course.

Picture This: An Introduction To Photovoice As A Public Health Promotion Tool


Picture This: An Introduction To Photovoice As A Public Health Promotion Tool
Carolyn Porta

PubH 7200 Section 117 Class #88049
May 25 (8am-5 pm)
0.5 credit or 8 CE contact hours
S/N only
Syllabus

“A picture is worth a thousand words.” We all appreciate a good photo and social media has made it possible for nearly anyone to take and share a photo with friends and strangers locally and across the globe. Photovoice in it’s purest form is a civic engagement technique designed to use photos/art to voice a community problem or issue AND possible solutions. To voice the problems, and the solutions, often by those who aren’t always heard…children living on the street speak up and photograph their homeless experiences…urban dwelling families photograph neighborhood decay and speak up about needing safe places for their children to play… In this course we will critically discuss photovoice as a health promotion tool in public health practice and research. We will examine strong and weak examples of published photovoice efforts, and spend most of the day learning how to do an effective collaborative photovoice health promotion project. Come prepared to learn, discuss, and engage in hands-on skills building.Photovoice expert researcher Dr. Robert Strack will co-teach this course, bringing unique expertise all will appreciate.

Principles of Risk Communication


Principles of Risk Communication
Katherine Waters, Lillian McDonald & Buddy Ferguson

PubH 7214 Section 101 Class #87420
May 22 (9 am -12 pm)
May 23, 24, 26 (8 am-12 pm)
1 credit or 15 CE contact hours
Syllabus

In brief, this course explores how people perceive risk and how to communicate effectively about risk, with an emphasis on preparing you to respond when a crisis occurs and you are on the firing line. The term “risk communication” refers to a body of knowledge and a set of practical skills that can be used by government, public or private agency public health, public safety and other professionals in characterizing and managing issues, disseminating information and communicating effectively in crisis or emergency situations.  Principles of risk communication are derived from social science research, psychological research and theory, communication theory and the accumulated experience of professionals who have addressed real-world public health, public safety or emergency management communication issues on a day-to-day basis.  This course covers key concepts of risk communication theory as well as their practical application to the collection and sharing of information in support of individual and community decision-making about public health issues.  The course will also examine new media and their role in public health communication.  Challenges in communicating with underserved and non-English speaking populations will be discussed. Experiential learning in the form of interactive exercises and on-camera practice are emphasized during the course.

Qualitative Data Analysis


Qualitative Data Analysis
Carolyn Porta

PubH 72547 Section 101 Class 87588
May 22 (9 am -12 pm)
May 23, 24, 26 (8 am-12 pm)
1 credit or 15 CE contact hours
Syllabus

You’ve conducted a bunch of key informant interviews, or a series of focus groups. Now what? How do you reflect the participants’ individual opinions and perspectives in your analysis while at the same time draw some collective conclusions? Is it possible to analyze qualitative data objectively? Do you need to use qualitative software? What is the best way to present qualitative data to different audiences? How can you collaboratively analyze qualitative data with community partners?

This course will provide discourse and some answers to the questions above, for currently employed professionals and students completing an advanced degree. The course is intended for students who plan to collect and analyze qualitative data, including those employed in public health, private, and non-profit agencies. Whether the data are collected to describe a problem, evaluate a program, or inform an intervention, the principles and challenges of analysis remain the same. This course will provide opportunity for analyzing and working with qualitative data from a variety of data collection methods and using multiple analysis approaches. Discussion of analyzing photograph and video data will provide students with insights on how best to analyze these types of data (time will not be spent analyzing these in class). Students are encouraged to bring any existing data they have as there may be opportunities in class to discuss and work with the data.

Prerequisite: Students are required to have prior qualitative methods content, evidenced by having taken a qualitative methods course, or working as a research assistant on a qualitative research study. Evidence of this background is required to receive a permission number to register for the course. Email evidence to Dr. Carolyn Porta at porta@umn.edu to receive permission

Apps, Maps, & Google: Using Technology-based Tools to Advance Public Health Research and Practice


Apps, Maps, & Google: Using Technology-based Tools to Advance Public Health Research and Practice
Carolyn Porta & Aric Bandy

PubH 7200 Section 102 Class #88034
May 22, 23, 24 (1-5 pm)
May 26 (1-4 pm)
1 credit or 15 CE contact hours
Syllabus

It’s one thing to use apps, maps, and google (e.g., sheets, docs) in our personal lives to connect with friends, track physical activity, navigate to a new coffee shop, or collaborate on a written proposal; it’s another thing to proficiently use these tools in our public health work, locally and globally. Accessible, low cost technology solutions are often underutilized in public health despite their potential for maximizing impact and efficiency. Whether a community needs assessment in North Minneapolis, an innovative micro-financing intervention in Uganda, or a multi-site program monitoring and evaluation activity along the East Coast, existing technology tools could be used to strengthen outcomes.

In this course we will practically examine and apply numerous technology solutions to common public health activities and challenges. We will examine solution types (i.e., android and iphone applications, cloud-based) and purposes (i.e., data collection, management, transfer, and storage; GIS mapping, behavior tracking; team collaboration). Led by a public health nurse interventionist and a serial technology entrepreneur, students will identify solution pathways for public health challenges and activities they care about. Emphasis in this course is on learning how to use what already exists (not to create new apps per se) and how to successfully advocate for using these technology tools in current public health practice arenas locally and globally. Come prepared to learn, discuss, and engage in hands-on skills building.

Community-based Participatory Research


Community-based Participatory Research
Cathy Jordan & Susan Gust

PubH 7244 Section 101 Class #88390
May 22, 23, 24 (1 pm -5 pm)
May 26 (1 pm-4 pm)
1 credit or 15 CE contact hours
Syllabus

This is an introductory course about community-based participatory research (CBPR) intended for graduate students and community practitioners interested in adding CBPR to their repertoire of effective approaches to understanding and addressing social and health disparities. We will explore topics such as the purpose and applications of CBPR; partnership formation and maintenance; issues of power, trust, race, class, and social justice; conflict resolution; ethical issues; CBPR’s relationship to cultural knowledge systems.

Food Safety and Defense in the Context of Global Food Security


Food Safety and Defense in the Context of Global Food Security
William Hueston & Fernando Sampedro

PubH 7200 Section 103 Class #88052
May 22, 23, 24 (1 pm -5 pm)
May 26 (1 pm-4 pm)
1 credit or 15 CE contact hours
Syllabus

Global Food Security exists when “all people, at all times, have physical, social and economic access to sufficient safe and nutritious food that meets their dietary needs and food preferences for an active and healthy life”. Achieving global food security involves optimizing the objectives of access, affordability, safety, nutrition and choice. This course focuses on assuring food safety and preventing intentional contamination of the food supply (food defense) while making progress toward global food security.

Science provides invaluable information for evidence-based public health and food system resilience, yet good science alone is not enough to effectively address grand challenges such as global food security. Government, industry and individual decisions affecting food systems are made daily in the face of significant gaps in our scientific knowledge. This course will stress a trans-disciplinary, systemic and holistic approach to food safety and defense in the context of global food security.

This course will enhance participant’s food safety and defense knowledge and skills in the context of global food security. At the conclusion of the course, participants will be able to work more effectively on food safety, food defense and food security where industry, government, academia and civil society all are involved.

Public Health Law (Week 1 of 2)


Public Health Law (Week 1 of 2)
Anne Barry

PubH 6711 Section 101 Class #87426
May 22, 23, 24 (1-5 pm) May 26 (1-4 pm)
May 30, 31, June 1 (1-5pm) June 2 (1-4 pm)
2 credits or 30 CE contact hours
Syllabus

This course will address basic concepts of public health law and the legal bases for the existence and administration of public health programs. Balancing the legal aspects of current public health issues, controversies, individual rights and the regulatory role of government in health service system will be considered.

Surveillance of Foodborne Pathogens in Humans


Surveillance of Foodborne Pathogens in Humans
Kirk Smith

PubH 7231 Section 101 Class #87616
May 22, 23, 24 (1 pm -5 pm)
May 26 (1 pm-4 pm)
1 credit or 15 CE contact hours
Syllabus

This course will focus on principles and methods for the surveillance of foodborne diseases and investigation of outbreaks, and their application for the assessment of food safety hazards. The integration of epidemiologic and laboratory methods for surveillance of human populations will be emphasized.

Global Food Systems: Pork


Global Food Systems: Pork
Stephanie Meyer & Craig Hedberg

PubH 7210 Section 101 Class #88040
May 24 (6-8 pm)
May 25 (7 am-6 pm)
.5 credit or 7.5 CE contact hour
S/N only
Syllabus

An understanding of the global food system for pork products is important for protecting public health. This course will describe the pork food system from farm to retail and review food safety issues associated with the production system. Participants will visit a pork processing plants to see the handling and processing of the animals as well as discuss animal health and environmental issues related to the safety of pork products. They will also visit a retail establishment handling pork products to examine the storage, handling and sale of pork products. The product distribution system will be reviewed and processing and distribution issues related to food safety will be discussed, along with consumer issues related to the safety of dairy products. Discussion will include element of foodborne disease epidemiology as it relates to pork products. Examples of real foodborne disease outbreaks involving pork products will illustrate critical control points in the production of safe pork products.

Week Two: May 30 – June 2

Axes of Inequity: Exploring Structural Racism and Health Inequities


Axes of Inequity: Exploring Structural Racism and Health Inequities
Rachel Hardeman

PubH 7200 Section 104 Class #88035
May 30 (9 am -12 pm)
May 31, June 1, 2 (8 am-12 pm)
1 credit or 15 CE contact hours
Syllabus

Health disparities will be eliminated when health equity is achieved. Achieving health equity requires dismantling systems of structured inequity and putting in their place systems in which all people can develop to their full potential. In order to do this, a clear understanding of structural racism is necessary. The main objectives of this course will be to: (1) identify and describe structural racism as an axes of inequity; (2) demonstrate the link between structural racism and health inequities; (3) explore disrupters of structural racism like Black Lives Matter and their role in public health (4) begin to develop the skills and critical awareness to act as a disrupter of structural racism in your public health sphere.

Data Driven and Time-sensitive Decision Making


Data Driven and Time-sensitive Decision Making
Amy Kircher

PubH 7258 Section 101 Class #88330
May 30 (9 am -12 pm)
May 31, June 1, 2 (8 am-12 pm)
1 credit or 15 CE contact hours
Syllabus

This course aims to provide knowledge and equip students with techniques to transform data into information that decision makers can use in order to make time critical decisions. It has been well documented that decision-making during a crisis is difficult as information is limited and established procedures may not be followed, thus increasing the amount of stress on individuals required to make those decisions. To improve crisis decision-making data collection, analysis, and synthesis on abundant and wide-variety of data are required in order to make an informed decision. This course will have didactic and application components where students will be able to apply the skills knowledge learned.

FSMA: From Legalese to Implementation – A Preventive Controls Qualified Individual Training


FSMA: From Legalese to Implementation – A Preventive Controls Qualified Individual Training
Heidi Kassenborg

PubH 7200 Section 108 Class #88043
May 30, 31 (8am – 5 pm)
June 1 (8am – 12pm)
1 credit or 15 CE contact hours
Syllabus

This course will be useful for those with an interest in preventing foodborne illness and food safety who are already in or just entering the workforce.

The Food Safety Modernization Act (FMSA) is described by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) as the most sweeping reform of our food safety laws in more than 70 years. This regulation is intended to ensure the safety of manufacturing/processing, packing and holding of food products for human consumption in the United States. One of the key parts of FSMA is the Current Good Manufacturing Practice, Hazard Analysis and Risk-based Preventive Controls for Human Food regulation (referred to as the Preventive Controls for Human Food regulation). For the first time food manufacturing facilities will be required to document that active managerial control of all food safety hazards that can reasonably occur in a food manufacturing plant has occurred. Additionally, it requires that certain activities must be completed by a “preventive controls qualified individual”.

This course, developed by Food Safety Preventive Controls Alliance, is the standardized curriculum recognized by FDA: successfully completing this course is one way to meet the requirements for a “preventive controls qualified individual” and receive a PCQI Certificate. Even those who do not currently need to have this designation will benefit from this course as it will cover one of the main components of FSMA and how it is being practically implemented.

Acknowledgments: This course was developed by the Food Safety Preventive Controls Alliance.

Introduction to GIS


Introduction to GIS
Len Kne & Lucas Winzenburg

PubH 7253 Section 101 Class #87551
May 30 (9 am -12 pm)
May 31, June 1, 2 (8 am-12 pm)
1 credit or 15 CE contact hours
S/N only
Syllabus

This course is an introduction to the concepts and uses of Geographic Information Systems (GIS). Lecture topics include GIS data structures, sources of data, GIS tools, vendors and software, health-related GIS applications, and resources. Through a combination of presentations and hands-on exercises, participants will learn and apply basic GIS concepts and the fundamentals of spatial analysis. Hands-on exercises include spatial data display and query, map generation, and a simple spatial analysis using ArcGIS software. Students will be required to apply GIS concepts, assigned readings, and project development principles to create their own GIS project model.

This course is designed for participants who have not had experience working with GIS software or applications; however, participants should have some experience with spreadsheet programs.

Monitoring and Evaluation for Global Programs


Monitoring and Evaluation for Global Programs
Elizabeth Kruger & Imee Cambronero

PubH 7200 Section 106 Class #88053
May 30 (9am – 12pm)
May 31, June 1, 2 (8am – 12pm)
1 credit or 15 CE contact hours
Syllabus

This course has an emphasis on understanding monitoring and evaluation in international development contexts for global health, food security, nutrition, and agriculture programs. Through real-life examples of programs being implemented in Africa and Asia, students will be exposed to key monitoring and evaluation (M&E) topics through a program lifecycle including designing and planning monitoring and evaluation activities and commonly used methods, tools, and practices.  Practical and ethical challenges encountered in working in evaluation in international contexts will also be discussed.

Surveillance of Zoonotic Pathogens in Animals


Surveillance of Zoonotic Pathogens in Animals
Scott Wells & Joni Scheftel

PubH 7235 Section 101 Class #87571
May 30 (9 am -12 pm)
May 31, June 1, 2 (8 am-12 pm)
1 credit or 15 CE contact hour
Syllabus

Using a case-study approach and field trips, this course will explore surveillance issues related to zoonotic pathogens in animals. Students will learn how to evaluate public health surveillance systems, then will work through multiple case studies during the week and participate in a field trip to provide opportunities to apply surveillance principles learned. A final group assignment to design a surveillance system for a zoonotic pathogen will provide the opportunity to assess learning gained.

Insects and Human Disease Impacts on Global Health: Medical Entomology for the Public Health Professional


Insects and Human Disease Impacts on Global Health: Medical Entomology for the Public Health Professional
Ann Fallon & Elizabeth Schiffman

PubH 7230 Section 102 Class #88037
May 30, 31, June 1 (1pm – 5 pm)
June 2 (1pm – 4pm)
1 credit or 15 CE contact hours
Syllabus

What’s so attractive about human blood? How have human interactions with insects evolved? Insects and ticks transmit viral, bacterial, protozoan and filarial diseases to humans, particularly in tropical countries. Dengue and other mosquito-borne viruses pose an increasing challenge in the southern US as climate change increases the range of important vector species. Lyme disease and other tick-borne diseases are increasing in the US, and pose challenges in diagnosis and treatment. This course will provide an overview of arthropod-borne disease and its impacts on global health. Students will study the historical, contemporary and epidemiologic stories demonstrating exposure and control strategies via student-led discussions, laboratory examinations, and critical review of current best practices in medical entomology.

Prerequisite: An undergraduate level course in biology, parasitology, or ecology

Public Health Law (Week 2 of 2)


Public Health Law (Week 2 of 2)
Anne Barry

PubH 6711 Section 101 Class 87426
May 23, 24, 25 (1-5 pm) May 27 (1-4 pm)
May 30, 31,June 1 (1-5pm) June 2 (1-4 pm)
2 credits or 30 CE contact hours

This course will address basic concepts of public health law and the legal bases for the existence and administration of public health programs. Balancing the legal aspects of current public health issues, controversies, individual rights and the regulatory role of government in health service system will be considered.

Topics in Hierarchical Bayesian Analysis


Topics in Hierarchical Bayesian Analysis
Bradley Carlin & Harrison Quick

PubH 6431 Section 101 Class #87608
May 30, 31 (1 pm – 4:30 pm)
June 1, 2 (1 pm – 5 pm)
1 credit or 15 CE contact hour
Syllabus

Hierarchical Bayesian methods combine information from various sources and are increasingly used in biomedical and public health settings to accommodate complex data and produce readily interpretable output. This course will introduce students to Bayesian methods, emphasizing the basic methodological framework, real-world applications, and practical computing.

Where's Family in Public Health?: Managing Chronic Health Conditions Through Relationships and Family Systems


Where’s Family in Public Health?: Managing Chronic Health Conditions Through Relationships and Family Systems
Jerica Berge

PubH 7200 Section 107 Class #88041
May 30, 31, June 1 (1pm – 5 pm)
June 2 (1pm – 4pm)
1 credit or 15 CE contact hours
Syllabus

Research has shown that management of chronic conditions is more successful when involving a significant other, parent or other family member. However, this is not always easy to do. This class will combine theory, research and clinical skills (e.g., working with couples, working with parent/child dyads or holding family meetings) to address how to include significant others, parents or other family members when managing chronic health conditions such as diabetes, asthma, cardiovascular disease or mental health conditions (e.g., chronic depression, personality disorders, substance abuse) in clinical work or public health interventions.

Week Three: June 5-9

Emerging and Ecological Determinants of Vectorborne Disease


Emerging and Ecological Determinants of Vectorborne Disease
Craig Hedberg & David Neitzel

PubH 7230 Section 103 Class #88039
June 5 (9am – 12 pm)
June 6, 7, 9 (8am – 12pm)
1 credit or 15 CE contact hours
Syllabus

This course will review problems of emerging vectorborne diseases from the perspective of the ecological determinants of disease transmission. The role of environmental factors including climate and land use patterns in the emergence of important mosquito and tickborne diseases will be explored. Case studies of emerging vectorborne diseases will be supplemented by field trips to explore vector ecology in MN.

The course addresses the assessment and basic sciences domain of The Core Competencies for Public Health Professionals; a consensus set of skills for the broad practice of public health, as defined by the 10 Essential Public Health Services. Similarly, the course addresses the Council on Education for Public Health (CEPH) foundational competencies on evidence-based approaches to public health and systems thinking.

Communication for Change: Multilevel Health Communication Strategies


Communication for Change: Multilevel Health Communication Strategies
Amenah Agunwamba

PubH 7200 Section 109 Class #88054
June 5 (9am – 12 pm)
June 6, 7, 9 (8am – 12pm)
1 credit or 15 CE contact hours
Syllabus

New communication channels and media have significantly changed the information environment, providing innovative ways for patients and communities to consume, exchange, and interact with information from sources all over the world. With these developments, come challenges and opportunities for public health professionals to serve as leading sources of health information.

The primary objective of this course will be to provide students with an overview on fundamental topics in health communication, with a focus on integrating theory, research methods, and key strategies to develop effective health communication interventions. This course will cover health communication functions, mechanisms, and methods to impact behavior change throughout populations, while defining the roles of patient-physician communication, mass media communication, health education and health literacy, policy and advocacy, and finally, technology and eMedicine. This course will be very interactive through critical examination of health messages in the media and through discussion of current events relevant to health communication. Students will apply research methods and communication strategies in Opinion Editorials, the development of a PSA script, and the development of a proposal for a theory informed health communication intervention. Ultimately, this course will equip leaders in public health to critically evaluate and address important community health issues – engaging, empowering, and influencing people through communication.

Health Impact Assessments: A New Tool to Promote Health Equity


Health Impact Assessments: A New Tool to Promote Health Equity
Eamon Flynn & Kathleen Theide Call

PubH 7200 Section 110 Class #88044
June 5 (9am – 12 pm)
June 6, 7, 9 (8am – 12pm)
1 credit or 15 CE contact hours
Syllabus

Health is largely influenced by the upstream social determinants of health, and yet decision makers rarely consider health. As a result, our social and physical environments often benefit certain groups over others, leading to health disparities. Health Impact Assessment (HIA) is a tool that uses the best-available evidence to uncover the health impacts of policies, plans and projects in order to influence decisions before they are finalized. Strong community engagement grounds the HIA in the health issues and topics important to those who will be impacted by the decision, leading to more equitable, healthier communities.

This course will introduce students to the six steps of an HIA. With each step, students will be given the opportunity to practice and apply key concepts. Throughout the week, students will work in teams to develop a plan for an HIA, culminating in a group presentation. Students will also critique an HIA of their choice to see how HIAs have been used in the real world. This course will also cover emerging topics and challenges in the HIA field, including data gaps, funding, and the use of rapid HIAs. Students will have a chance to hear from several guest speakers who will share their insights and experiences conducting HIAs in Minnesota.

Prerequisite: Graduate or professional student or professional in public health, public policy, design, social work or related fields. Other individuals interested in the course should contact the course instructor for permission. Students are required to complete a pre-course assignment prior to the first day of class, which is outlined on Moodle. This assignment is due at 5pm on Sunday June 4th.

Parental Incarceration and Child Welfare


Parental Incarceration and Child Welfare
Rebecca Shlafer

PubH 7200 Section 111 Class #88055
June 5 (9am – 12 pm)
June 6, 7, 9 (8am – 12pm)
1 credit or 15 CE contact hours
Syllabus

It is now estimated that more than 2.7 million children have a parent currently behind bars, and more than 5 million children have experienced a parent’s incarceration in their lifetime. Many of the factors that increase a parent’s risk for involvement in the criminal justice system are the very same factors that increase risk for involvement in the child welfare system. When parents are incarcerated or families are involved in child protection, there are collateral consequences for children, families, communities and society. Children of incarcerated parents and those who have been victims of abuse and/or neglect are at risk for a number of adverse outcomes, including behavior problems, academic difficulties, substance abuse, and criminal activity. This course will use an interdisciplinary perspective to explore the complex intersection between parental incarceration and child welfare, focusing on the ways these systems intersect and the impacts on children and families. This class will include opportunities to learn from local and national experts from practice and policy settings. Topics will include parent-child contact during incarceration, intersections between incarceration and child welfare, and systemic disparities by race and class.

Project Management Fundamentals


Project Management Fundamentals
Susan Borowick

PubH 7200 Section 112 Class #88045
June 5 (9am – 12 pm)
June 6, 7, 9 (8am – 12pm)
1 credit or 15 CE contact hours
S/N only
Syllabus

This course focuses on two essential skill sets that support effective project management in an organizational setting:

  1. Foundational project management processes and tools that support phases in the lifecycle of a project, including project initiation, planning, execution, control, and closing.
  2. Effective communication and interpersonal skills that support the management of a project, including team and stakeholder relationships and communication.

The course will be valuable for program and project managers, project coordinators, project planners, team supervisors, and project team members who need a common language and skill set of project management processes and related communication skills. Participants are invited to bring individual projects to the course. These will be used as the basis for case studies and other exercises, allowing participants to immediately apply what they are learning, as well as receive feedback from the instructor and their fellow participants.

Community Engagement: Skills in Relationship Building


Community Engagement: Skills in Relationship Building
Antonia Apolinario-Wilcoxon, LaRone Greer, David Everett and Anne Barry

PubH 7200 Section 113 Class #88056
June 5, 6, 7 (1pm – 5pm)
June 9 (1pm – 4pm)
1 credit or 15 CE contact hours
S/N only
Syllabus

This course introduces the student to develop skills for working in and with community.  There are disparities or differential outcomes for populations of color and American Indians, both in who gets access to or involuntarily forced into services and then, once receiving services, in outcomes from the services provided. There is limited meaningful involvement of the communities being served in the design of the programs intended to support them. This results in programs being designed from the dominant culture’s perspective that make it harder to reach the outcomes all communities support and can benefit from. The first part of the class will focus on understanding community using the principles of community organizing and engagement and understanding the lived experiences of various populations. The second part of class will focus on actual practice and skill building to start the process of building relationships with community members. It is expected that participants have a basic knowledge and sensitivity to differences, power, white privilege and unconscious bias.

Eat, Pray, Regulate: An Analysis of the Current Food Regulatory System


Eat, Pray, Regulate: An Analysis of the Current Food Regulatory System
Benjamin Miller & Carrie Rigdon

PubH 7200 Section 114 Class #88046
June 5, 6, 7 (1pm – 5pm)
June 9 (1pm – 4pm)
1 credit or 15 CE contact hours
Syllabus

This course will cover the intersection of science, law, economics and human behavior around what we eat. Specifically, this course analyzes how these four influences have shaped the current regulatory structure for protecting the food supply.

Food safety laws and regulations in the US are complicated and have been largely reactive. How a food product is regulated is determined by several factors including commodity type (e.g. meat or dairy product) geography (state, federal or local jurisdiction), and location in the food chain (e.g., manufacturing or retail). When federal food laws and regulations were first promulgated in the late 1800’s and early 1900’s, it was unlikely that the authors would be able to predict the variety of food choices available today. Science is changing how food is made, economic forces are changing where food is produced and how it is transported, and consumers are seeking choices based on economic, cultural, ecological, and medicinal beliefs. All the while, our understanding of food safety risks is constantly evolving. Students will get the opportunity to analyze these issues by selecting a relevant topic and presenting their analyses on the final day of the course. Examples of potential topics include: Multi-drug resistant Salmonella contamination in poultry products, Food Safety Modernization Act Proposed or Final Rules (e.g., Produce Safety Rule, Foreign Supplier Verification, Accreditation of Third Party Auditors to Conduct Food Safety Audits and Issue Certificates, Current Good Manufacturing Practice and Hazard Analysis and Risk-Based exercises and on-camera practice are emphasized during the course.

Food, Politics and Health in the United States: A Focus on Obesity


Food, Politics and Health in the United States: A Focus on Obesity
Aida Miles & Jamie Stang

PubH 7200 Section 115 Class #88047
June 5, 6, 7 (1 pm-5 pm)
June 9 (1 pm-4 pm)
1 credit or 15 CE contact hours
Syllabus

This course will provide an overview of how politics have affected food access and availability throughout time, nationally and internationally.  It will engage participants in discussions of US food assistance programs and how they impact a population’s health.  Participants will also explore the intricacies of how policy affects an individual’s autonomy in choosing the foods they eat.  It will empower participants to think critically about food assistance policies and programs and explore the role they can play in local and national efforts and decisions regarding food and health.

Prerequisite: Graduate or professional student or health professional in a health-related field such as public health, medicine, nursing, dentistry, pharmacy, nutrition, social work or related fields. Other individuals interested in the course should contact the course instructor for permission.

NOTE: Students are required to complete a pre-course assignment prior to the first day of class, a SNAP Challenge, outlined later in the syllabus.

Innovation and Entrepreneurial Leadership in Public Health


Innovation and Entrepreneurial Leadership in Public Health
Rick Hall

PubH 7200 Section 116 Class #88048
June 5, 6 , 7 (1 pm-5 pm)
June 9 (1 pm-4 pm)
1 credit or 15 CE contact hours
Syllabus

In a time of extraordinary disruptions, innovative leadership is essential for the future of public health. This course will examine current and upcoming disruptions affecting public health while exploring the application of innovation science and entrepreneurial thinking to solve problems. In-class skill-development exercises will facilitate competence in problem solving, business modeling, customer development, marketing and finance.

War, Migration and Public Health


War, Migration and Public Health
Cheryl Robertson

PubH 7200 Section 118 Class #88050
June 5, 6, 7 (1 pm – 5 pm)
June 9 (1 pm – 4 pm)
1 credit or 15 CE contact hours
Syllabus

Students will analyze the experiences of war, displacement, and associated stressors affecting psychosocial health of refugees. The focus of the course will be on the migration experiences, family and community dynamics, and approaches for recovery. Students will develop insight and skills to create innovative community-based interventions to support refugee health.

Global Food Systems: Produce


Global Food Systems: Produce
Stephanie Meyer & Craig Hedberg

PubH 7210 Section 102 Class #88042
June 7 (6-8 pm)
June 8 (7:30 am-5 pm)
.5 credit or 7.5 CE contact hours
S/N only
Syllabus

An understanding of the global food system for fresh fruits and vegetables is important in the protection of the community and security of the public’s health. This system is reviewed beginning with commercial cultivation on the farm. A commercial or organic grower is visited to illustrate cultivation, irrigation, fertilization, pesticide treatment and environmental issues related to the safety of fresh fruits and vegetables. A fresh produce distributor is visited to illustrate the variety, volume and sources of fresh produce available in the marketplace. The product distribution system is reviewed. A fresh produce processor is visited to illustrate produce handling and sanitation measures. A retail and/or food service establishment handling fresh fruits and vegetables is visited to examine the storage, handling and sale of fresh produce. Consumer issues related to the safety of fresh fruits and vegetables are discussed. Discussion will include element of foodborne disease epidemiology as it relates to fresh produce products. Examples of real food-borne disease outbreaks involving fresh fruits and vegetables are used to illustrate critical control points in the production of safe fresh fruits and vegetables.

2017 Public Health Institute Competencies/Domains

The Core Competencies for Public Health Professionals (Core Competencies) are a consensus set of skills for the broad practice of public health, as defined by the 10 Essential Public Health Services. Developed by the Council on Linkages Between Academia and Public Health Practice (Council on Linkages), the Core Competencies reflect foundational skills desirable for professionals engaging in the practice, education, and research of public health. http://www.phf.org/resourcestools/pages/core_public_health_competencies.aspx

Public Health Policy & Systems Development Domain
(Policy Development/Program Planning Skills – Leadership and Systems Thinking Skills)

      • PubH 7200-104  Axes of Inequity: Exploring Structural Racism and Health Inequities
      • PubH 7258-101  Data Driven and Time-sensitive Decision Making
      • PubH 7200-115  Food, Politics and Health in the US: A Focus on Obesity
      • PubH 7200-103  Food Safety and Defense in the Context of Global Security
      • PubH 7210-101  Global Food System – Pork
      • PubH 7210-102  Global Food System – Produce
      • PubH 7262-101  Globalization and Health
      • PubH 7200-106  Monitoring and Evaluation in Global Programs
      • PubH 7200-111  Parental Incarceration and Child Welfare
      • PubH 6711-101  Public Health Law

Community Intervention Domain
(Community Dimensions of Practice Skills – Cultural Competency Skills)

      • PubH 7200-102  Apps, Maps & Google: Using Technology-based Tools to Advance Public Health Research and Practice
      • PubH 7244-101  Community-based Participatory Research
      • PubH 7200-113  Community Engagement: Skills in Relationship Building
      • PubH 7200-110  Health Impact Assessments: A New Tool to Promote Health Equity
      • PubH 7200-117  Picture This! An Introduction to Photovoice as a Public Health Promotion Tool
      • PubH 7200-118  War, Migration and Public Health

Assessment and Basic Sciences Domain
(Analytic/Assessment Skills – Basic Public Health Science Skills)

      • PubH 7230-101  Antibiotic Resistance, Use and Stewardship: Theory to Practice
      • PubH 7200-114  Eat, Pray, Regulate: An Analysis of the Current Food Regulatory System
      • PubH 7230-103  Emerging and Ecological Determinants of Vectorborne Disease
      • PubH 7253-101  Introduction to GIS
      • PubH 7200-101  Introduction to R
      • PubH 7230-102  Insects and Human Disease Impacts on Global Health
      • PubH 7257-101  Qualitative Data Analysis
      • PubH 7231-101  Surveillance of Foodborne Pathogens in Humans
      • PubH 7235-101  Surveillance of Zoonotic Pathogens in Animals
      • PubH 6431-101  Topics in Hierarchical Bayesian Analysis

Program Management and Communication Domain
(Financial Planning and Management Skills – Communication Skills)

      • PubH 7200-109 Communication for Change: Multilevel Health Communication Strategies
      • PubH 7200-108 FSMA: From Legalese to Implementation – A Preventive Controls Qualified Individual Training
      • PubH 7227-101 Incident Management Systems: The Public Health Role
      • PubH 7200-116 Innovation and Entrepreneurial Leadership in Public Health
      • PubH 7214-101 Principles of Risk Communication
      • PubH 7200-112 Project Management Fundamentals
      • PubH 7200-107 Where is ‘Family’ in Public Health? Managing Chronic Health Conditions Through Relationships and Family Systems

Graduate-Level Academic Credit


Graduate-Level Academic Credit

Degree-Seeking Student at the University of Minnesota – Registration Begins on April 11
Choose this registration option if you are currently enrolled in a graduate-level degree or certificate program at the University of Minnesota Twin Cities campus or if you have been formally admitted to a graduate-level program for Summer 2017.

To register for courses, go directly to www.myu.umn.edu

Non-degree Seeking Student – Registration Begins on April 18
Students who have not been admitted to a graduate level program at the University of Minnesota are considered non-degree seeking students.  If you are in this category and are interested in earning graduate credit you must Submit a “Registration Request for Graduate Credit” form: http://policy.umn.edu/forms/otr/otr026.pdf.  Complete sections 1 & 2, leave section 3 blank, sign and date section 4. Then, scan and email to phi@umn.edu.

Unsure about your status?
Contact Student Services 612-624-6952 at the University of Minnesota School of Public Health before you select your registration option.

Tuition & Fees

Resident Non-resident
Tuition $932.96/credit* $1225.32/credit*
Institute Fee $25/credit $25/credit
Total $957.96/credit $1250.32

*These tuition rates are available to University of Minnesota School of Public Health MPH and non-admitted students. Tuition rates and fees for other programs of study vary. Other fees such as a student services fee, technology fee, and GAPSA may apply, depending on student status and credit load for May Term/Summer Session 2017.

Fees will be assessed to students participating in  field trip courses to cover transportation costs.

Visit OneStop for details on all fees. Questions about student fees can also be directed to Carol Francis at franc004@umn.edu or 612-624-6952.

Payment of Tuition & Fees
The University of Minnesota uses electronic billing and offers payment through MyU and your student financial account. You will automatically receive notification from the Bursar’s Office via your University of Minnesota e-mail account when your bill is ready to be viewed online. Paper bills are not available.

Third-Party Billing
Third-party billing is available for payment of tuition and fees.

If an organization not owned by you or a family member makes a commitment to pay your educational expenses, it is considered a third-party sponsor by the University of Minnesota. When payment is due on your student account, the sponsor is billed by the University. The sponsor provides billing authorization by letter, purchase order or voucher directed to the Third Party Billing Office and your university student account is credited for the expected payment amount.

Visit OneStop for complete information and directions for requesting third-party billing or call 612-625-8559.

Cancellation
If you registered for courses for graduate academic credit, you may cancel your registration yourself prior to May 22 at www.myu.umn.edu. After May 22 you must send written notification to cancel your registration for Institute courses to the School of Public Health Student Services Offices.

E-mail: franc004@umn.edu
Fax: 612-624-4498

Tuition and Fees Refund Schedule for 1 & 2 week courses

(.5 credit courses must be cancelled on day 1 of the course)

Days of Term % of Refund Change Grade Base or Variable Credits Required
to Cancel
Required
to Add
Day 1  100% Allowed No approval No approval
Day 2  50% Allowed See instruction below Instructor approval
Day 3 No refund Not allowed No approval (“W” recorded on transcript) Approvals from instructor and college
After Day 3 No refund Not allowed College scholastic committee approval (“W” recorded on transcript) Approvals from instructor and college scholastic committee


Professional Continuing Education (contact hours only)


Professional Continuing Education (contact hours only)

Institute courses are also available for continuing education contact hours. The registration fee is: $595/per 15 contact hours. All courses are eligible for CPH recertification credit. Credit hours vary by course.

Register for non-credit

Registration Deadline
The registration deadline is one week before the class begins. To register after that date, please call 612-624-3029 or email carls020@umn.edu for space availability.

Cancellation
If you are registered as a professional continuing education participant, send written notice to cancel your registration by e-mail to phi@umn.edu

Refunds
The following refund policy applies to all continuing education registrations.

  • An administrative fee of $50 will be charged on all cancellation requests received after the first day of the course.
  • In the event of course cancellation, a complete refund of fees paid will be made. In the event of a cancellation, the University of Minnesota is not responsible for participant housing or travel expenses.

The faculty who teach in the Public Health Institute come from a variety of schools and organizations, giving you a well-rounded education and experience.

2017 Public Health Institute Faculty

Amenah Agunwamba, ScD, MPH, Assistant Professor of Health Services Research, Department of Health Sciences Research, Robert D. and Patricia E Kern Center, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN

Antonia Apolinario-Wilcoxon, MIM, EdD, Community Relations Director, Minnesota Department of Human Services, St. Paul, MN

Aric Bandy, President, Agosto, Minneapolis, MN

Anne M. Barry, JD, MPH, Senior Researcher, Arizona State University, College of Health Solutions; Senior Lecturer, School of Public Health, University of Minnesota

Jeffrey Bender, DVM, MS, Professor, Veterinary Population Medicine, Co-Director, Upper Midwest Agricultural Safety and Health Center, University of Minnesota

Jerica M. Berge, PhD, MPH, LMFT, CFLE, Associate Professor, Co-Director, Healthy Eating and Activity across the Lifespan (HEAL) Center, Associate Director, Citizen Professional Center, University of Minnesota Medical School, Department of Family and Community Medicine

Susan E. Borowick, MA, Executive Director, Professional Development and LearningLife, College of Continuing Education, University of Minnesota

Kathleen Thiede Call, PhD, Professor, Health Policy and Management, SHADAC, Co-Chair, Health Equity Work Group Co-Director, School of Public Health, University of Minnesota

Imee Cambronero, MPH, Senior Specialist, Food Security Monitoring and Evaluation, Save the Children US, Washington DC

Bradley Carlin, PhD, Mayo Professor of Public Health; Division Head, Division of Biostatistics, School of Public Health, University of Minnesota

David Everett, PhD, Diversity and Inclusion Consultant, Minnesota Department of Human Services, St. Paul, MN

Ann Fallon, PhD, Distinguished McKnight University Professor, Department of Entomology, University of Minnesota

Buddy Ferguson, Risk Communication Consultant, St. Paul, MN

Eamon Flynn, MPH, Health Policy Analyst, Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, Baltimore, MD

LaRone Greer, MSW, Minnesota Department of Human Services, St. Paul, MN

Susan Gust, Community Development Consultant, Minneapolis, MN, Consultant, Program for Health Disparities Research, University of MN, Co-instructor, School of Public Health, University of Minnesota

Rick Hall, PhD, RDN, FAND, Director of Health Innovation Programs, College of Nursing and Health Innovation, Arizona State University, Phoenix, AZ

Rachel R. Hardeman, PhD, MPH, Assistant Professor, Division of Health Policy and Management, School of Public Health, University of Minnesota

Craig W. Hedberg, PhD, Professor, Division of Environmental Health Sciences and Chair, Public Health Practice Major, School of Public Health, University of Minnesota

William D. Hueston, DVM, PhD, DACVPM, Professor Emeritus, Center for Animal Health and Food Safety and Professor, College of Veterinary Medicine and School of Public Health, University of Minnesota

Catherine Jordan, PhD, LP, Associate Professor, Pediatrics and Extension; Consulting Research Director, Children & Nature Network; Executive Editor, CES4Health.info, University of Minnesota

Heidi Kassenborg, DVM, MPH, Foodborne Illness Prevention and Response Consultant, Kassenborg Consulting, LLC, Minneapolis/St. Paul, MN

Amy Kircher, DrPH, Director, Food Protection and Defense Institute; Assistant Professor, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Minnesota

Len Kne, MGIS, Associate Director, U-Spatial, Research Computing, University of Minnesota; MGIS Faculty, Geography, Environment and Society, University of Minnesota

Elizabeth Kruger, MPH, Evaluation Officer, Margaret A. Cargill Philanthropies, Eden Prairie, MN

Lillian McDonald, MA, Managing Director, ERS (Emergency Response Systems), Twin Cities Public Television, St. Paul, MN

Stephanie Meyer, MPH, Epidemiologist Senior, Foodborne, Waterborne, Vectorborne, and Zoonotic Diseases Section, Infectious Disease Epidemiology, Prevention and Control Division, Minnesota Department of Health, St. Paul, MN

Aida Miles, MMSc, RD, LD, FAND, Director, Coordinated Masters in Public Health Nutrition Program, Division of Epidemiology and Community Health, School of Public Health, University of Minnesota

Benjamin Miller, MPH, PhD, Division Director, Food and Feed Safety, Minnesota Department of Agriculture, St. Paul, MN

David Neitzel, M.S., Supervisor, Vectorborne Diseases Unit, Infectious Disease Epidemiology, Prevention, and Control, Minnesota Department of Health, St. Paul, MN

Jon Oliver, PhD, Assistant Professor, Division of Environmental Health Sciences, School of Public Health, University of Minnesota

Cheryl Petersen-Kroeber, Director, Emergency Preparedness and Response, Minnesota Department of Health, St. Paul, MN

Carolyn Porta, PhD, MPH, RN, SANE-A, Associate Professor, Director of Global Programming, School of Nursing, Adjunct Associate Professor, Division of Epidemiology and Community Health, School of Public Health, University of Minnesota

Harrison Quick, PhD, Assistant Professor, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Dornsife School of Public Health, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA

Carrie Rigdon, PhD, Response, Training and Outreach Supervisor, Food and Feed Safety Division, Minnesota Department of Agriculture, St. Paul, MN

Cheryl L. Robertson, PhD, MPH, RN, FAAN, Associate Professor, Chair, Population Health and Systems Cooperative Unit, School of Nursing, University of Minnesota

Fernando Sampedro, PhD, Associate Professor, Center for Animal Health and Food Safety, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Minnesota

Joni Scheftel, DVM, MPH, DACVPM, State Public Health Veterinarian and Supervisor, Zoonotic Diseases Unit, Minnesota Department of Health, St. Paul, MN; Adjunct faculty, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Minnesota

Elizabeth Schiffman, MPH, MA, Epidemiologist Senior, Foodborne, Waterborne, Vectorborne, and Zoonotic Diseases Section, Infectious Disease Epidemiology, Prevention and Control Division, Minnesota Department of Health, St. Paul, MN

Rebecca Shlafer, PhD, MPH, Assistant Professor, Division of General Pediatrics and Adolescent Health, Department of Pediatrics, University of Minnesota

Kirk E. Smith, DVM, MS, PhD, Manager, Foodborne, Waterborne, Vectorborne and Zoonotic Disease Section, Infectious Disease Epidemiology, Prevention and Control Division, Minnesota Department of Health, St. Paul, Minnesota; Adjunct Faculty, School of Public Health, University of Minnesota

Jamie Stang, PhD, MPH, RDN, Associate Professor, School of Public Health, University of Minnesota

William A. Toscano, Jr., PhD, Professor, Division of Environmental Health Sciences, School of Public Health, University of Minnesota

Katherine Waters, DVM, MPH, DACVPM, Program Director, Executive Program in Public Health Practice, School of Public Health, University of Minnesota

Eric Weber, PhD, Lecturer, Division of Biostatistics, School of Public Health, University of Minnesota

Scott J. Wells, DVM, PhD, DACVPM, Director, Center for Animal Health and Food Safety, Professor, Department of Veterinary Population Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Minnesota

Lucas Winzenburg, MSc, Education and Outreach Coordinator, Polar Geospatial Center/U-Spatial, University of Minnesota

Joel Wu, JD, MPH, MA, Senior Fellow, School of Public Health, University of Minnesota

Course materials and textbooks

All academic credit students and all professional continuing education participants are responsible for the purchase of required course materials and/or textbooks in addition to tuition and fees. Course material requirements will be available upon registration via the Moodle site.

Course Location

Institute courses are held on the Minneapolis campus of the University of Minnesota. Specific directions, classroom locations and maps will be e-mailed to all participants no later than two weeks before the start of their first course.

Housing

The University of Minnesota offers a number of summer housing options for students.

Public Health Institute Planning Team

Chris Carlstrom
Director
carls020@umn.edu
612-624-3029
Ruth Rasmussen
Education Specialist
rasmu048@umn.edu
612-625-8836

Coleen Dorman
Program Associate
ctdorman@umn.edu
612-626-6626

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For more information contact:

Summer Public Health Institute
Telephone: 612-626-6626
Email: phi@umn.edu

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