Curriculum

As sovereign nations, American Indian tribes are responsible for the overall health and well-being of their members along with the land and environment of their Tribe.

Tribes are becoming increasingly involved in more public health activities and regulation and deliver public health services through various funding sources, grants and contracts, alone or in collaboration with other Tribes and local county and state health departments.

The American Indian Public Health and Wellness Certificate is 12 credits and may  be completed in two terms (6cr/term).  Presently courses are offered onsite, scheduled one or two days/week in the early evening.

All courses are designed to be inclusive of all students from all races, cultures, and experiences. Everyone is welcome to attend the courses. While the focus is on American Indians, there are advantages to learning accurate history, other health models, innovative health services, and the importance of using a holistic approach of health and wellness for all populations.

Required courses (6cr) may be taken in any order:

PubH 6241 American Indian Health Policy, Law and Health Services Administration, 2cr (Fall)   

As sovereign nations, American Indian Tribes are responsible for the overall health and well-being of their members along with the land and environment of their respective tribe. Tribes are becoming increasingly involved in more public health activities and regulations, and deliver public health services through various funding sources, grants and contracts, alone or in collaboration with other tribes and local governments, county and state health departments.

This course provides a general basis for understanding American Indian public health and wellness. Central to this area of study, is an appreciation to understand the unique governmental relationship based on how the federal government relates to tribal nations as distinct sovereign political entities, not as a racial classification. The trust responsibility is a government to government relationship as established in the U.S. Constitution.

In this course students will learn about the legal responsibility of the United States to the 573 federally recognized tribes, to provide health services to American Indians. Students will examine the public health issues facing American Indian communities; review historical implications, analyze legislation, apply specific financing requirements, and gain an understanding of the unique American Indian public health system and the complex set of services, activities, collaborations and stakeholders that varies by tribe and region.

This is a required course for those seeking a certificate or minor. It is designed to help students understand how to work respectfully and effectively with tribes and American Indian communities, to understand the basis of health services and implications of specific tribal (local and federal) law to help improve the devastating health issues currently experienced by American Indians.

While this course focuses on American Indian Public Health and Wellness, Health Policy, Law, Health Services Administration, there are many parallels that can be made by students related to other governance structures from around the world. The lessons can help fortify the knowledge of all students regardless of race, and culture, that can be utilized in individual professional endeavors.

PubH 6242 American Indian Cultural Humility, 2cr (Spring)

The course will present evidence that cultural humility is a lifelong quest toward achieving positive outcomes in work with American Indian Tribes and American Indian communities. It is essential that health care and health service providers learn the respective cultures of the American Indian population they are serving. Equally important is the fact that every federally recognized tribe, of which there are 573, has their own unique traditional customs, history with other tribes, and often subpopulations within the governance of a single tribal government. The realization of understanding how populations have been driven by their respective cultures to their overall health and well-being is necessary to promote achievement of positive outcomes for stakeholders and communities.

The course will target methods to help health professionals to ensure that health services take into account individual understanding of the professional’s knowledge and how this knowledge should be respectful of individual cultural preferences. A systematic process will be provided to assist in how to learn community policies, learning processes, and traditions; as well as learning about various structures by which the culture of governments, organizations and individuals develop and support the attitudes, behaviors, practices and systems that are needed for effective cross-cultural interactions between health professionals and community members. Students will learn that ultimately, cultural humility effectiveness is determined by the individual who is receiving the services.

The course is grounded in the understanding that cultural humility can effectively be used to strive for continuous improvement, to effectively utilize assets and address the health needs of individual American Indian communities.

Constructs learned from this course can be advantageous for students to adapt to other unique populations around the world. Learning the importance humility and respect is significant for development of policies that include community participation and are critical to understanding readiness to foster governmental and public health for all populations.

PubH 6243 American Indian Research, Evaluation and Collaborations, 2cr (Spring)                                 

It is important to understand how unique and to understand the differences of doing research with Tribal governments. As sovereign nations, American Indian Federally Recognized Tribes are responsible for the overall health and well-being of their populations, as well as controlling research and evaluation activities; and development of formal collaborations. A duly elected Tribal government is responsible for all functions and activities of the Tribe. Tribes have an inherent and legal responsibility to protect Tribal affairs, businesses, and traditional values and customs. Included in Tribal responsibilities is the ability to develop and maintain policies to protect the integrity of operations and guard against predatory and harmful use of data against the population they serve. This is an absolute and non-negotiable function of a Tribe to ensure present and continued viability of all future generations.

This course will provide specific examples of data sharing agreements, Memorandums of Agreement or Understanding, legal basis for confidentially, discuss community readiness, and community evaluations. It is designed to help students understand how to work respectfully and effectively with Tribes and American Indian communities, and to understand the basis of research, evaluation, and collaboration. This course focuses on stakeholder driven: participation, issue identification, data sharing, and benefit to community.

To help ensure ethical and cultural values are protected an increasing number of Tribes are forming their own Institutional Review Boards (IRBs) under 45 CFR 46. The course will offer examples of Tribal IRBs and specific IRB components for American Indian populations.

Tribal governments represent communities with distinctive social, cultural, and spiritual qualities that embody a unique context for the review and conduct of research. This course will provide numerous examples of Tribally developed research and review mechanisms are tailored to specific community needs and interests.

Constructs learned from this course can be advantageous for students to adapt to other unique populations around the world. Learning the importance confidentiality, data ownership, humility and respect is significant for development of policies that include community participation and are critical to understanding readiness to foster governmental and public health for all populations.

Learning how American Indian’s resiliencies and assets have allowed this population to exist today are valid examples that can be utilized (with adaptations) for non-American Indian populations.

Students from all races, cultures, and experience are welcome to attend this course. While the focus is on American Indians, there are advantages to learning accurate history, other health models, innovative humility and health in all services, and the importance of using a holistic approach of health and wellness for all populations.

Students must complete 6 credits of elective credits. Choose 6 cr from:

  • AMIN 5107 The Structure of Anishinaabemowin, the Ojibwe Language
  • AMIN 5108 History of Anishinaabemowin, the Ojibwe Language
  • AMIN 5109 Anishinaabe Literature
  • AMIN 5141 American Indian Language Planning, 3 cr (Fall)
  • AMIN 5202 American Indians and the Supreme Court, 3cr
  • AMIN 5303 American Indians and Photography
  • AMIN 5402 American Indians and the Cinema, 3cr
  • AMIN 5409 American Indian Women: Ethnographic & Ethnohistorical Perspectives, 3cr (Fall)
  • AMIN 5412 Comparative Indigenous Feminisms, 3cr
  • AMIN 5601 Archaeology and Native Americans
  • AMIN 5890 Readings in American Indian and Indigenous History, 3cr (Fall)
  • AMIN 5920 Topics in American Indian studies, 3cr
  • AMIN 8910 Optics in American Indian and Indigenous Studies, 1-3cr
  • CI 8645 Indigenous Language Revitalization and Activist Research Methods, 3cr (Fall)
  • CSPH 5212 Peace Building through Mindfulness, Transformative Dialogue in the Global Community, 3cr (Spring 1 F, 3 Sat)
  • DAKO 5126 Advanced Dakota Language I, 3 cr (Fall)
  • DAKO 5129 Advanced Dakota Language II, 3cr (Spring)
  • LAW 6236  Indian  Law, 3cr (Fall)
  • LING 5900 Topics in Linguistics, 1-4cr (Fall)
  • NURS 5808 American Indian Health and Health Care
  • OJIB 5106 Advanced Ojibew Language  I, 3cr (Fall)
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